Required for ALL VUSN PhD Students


NRSC 302. Advanced Doctoral Seminar I. This course consists of a series of seminars focusing on issues related to qualifying examinations, the dissertation and continued development of a program of research.  The topics are selected by course faculty and the students who plan to take the comprehensive examinations within the next 9-12 months.  Topics and experiences may include proposal development, grant applications, mock proposal reviews, qualifying examination situations and dissemination of research findings.  The seminar is required for two consecutive semesters.   Prerequisite:  Core PhD course completion consistent with ability to complete the qualifying examination within 9-12 months after registration.  [1 credit]



NRSC 303. Advanced Doctoral Seminar II. This is the second seminar course in this series. Prerequisite: Completion of NRSC 302: Advanced Doctoral Seminar I. [1 credit]



NRSC 304. Ethical and Legal Issues in Research. Provides an overview of issues related to the responsible conduct of research, including data management, vulnerable populations, authorship and publication, conflicts of interest and collaboration. Federal and institutional guidelines are included. Prerequisite: enrollment in the PhD program or consent of faculty. [1 credit].



NRSC 305. Informatics and Scholarly Inquiry. This course provides an overview of informatics, the transformation of data into information, knowledge, decisions and actions to improve outcomes. To take advantage of electronic data mines, scholars of the future will need to understand the basics of databases and the structure of nursing vocabularies. Knowledge management to support evidence-based practice in nursing will be a critical skill. In addition, this course prepares the student to use available technology tools to present, interpret, and organize data. Prerequisite: enrollment in the PhD program or consent of faculty. [2 credits].



NRSC 306. Research Design and Statistics I. This course focuses on understanding and applying the basic concepts of descriptive and relational research design and statistics. Students will be introduced to the full range of designs available to address research aims, moving from descriptive to experimental and quasi-experimental. After examining the relationship of research aims to research design, the nature of measurement and causal of inference, relevant statistical methods for visualizing, describing and making inferences from data will be introduced. The focus will be on univariate and bivariate descriptive methods. Statistical computing packages will be used. Published research will be used to develop the student's ability to evaluate the design and statistical methods used to describe health care phenomena as well relationships among them. Prerequisite: enrollment in the PhD program or consent of faculty. [3 credits].



NRSC 307. Research Design and Statistics II. The course expands the concepts and applications of RD&S I including an introduction to longitudinal and randomized control design issues. Topics related to internal validity, experimental designs and issues in comparing individuals and groups cross-sectionally and longitudinally will be detailed. Students will be introduced to issues in external validity and the relationships between internal and external validities. Parametric and non-parametric univariate comparative statistical methods used to analyze data resulting from cross sectional and randomized controlled designs will be included. Students will be expected to generate and interpret results from statistical software and present relevant information in figures, tables and text. Concepts will be studied within the context of evaluating published research. Prerequisite: completion of Research Design and Statistics I or consent of faculty. [3 credits].



NRSC 308. Research Design and Statistics III. This course is focused on advanced designs and multivariate statistical techniques. Design topics include advanced issues in external validity, field experimentation versus laboratory experiments, quasi-experimental and blended designs as well as special considerations for nested and complex longitudinal designs. Related statistical topics include advanced multiple linear regression methods (e.g. path and structural equation modeling), log-linear models and advanced techniques in survival and longitudinal data analysis. These methods and concepts will be discussed and evaluated through educational resources and published research using them. Students will have the opportunity to develop advanced skills in statistical applications most commonly used in their respective areas of interest. Prerequisite: completion of Research Design and Statistics II or consent of faculty. [3 credits].



NRSC 309. Special Topics in Quantitative Methods. This course provides an overview of varied and timely topics in the field of quantitative methods. Exemplar topics may include issues in data collection methods such as using online or other resources, an examination of how quantitative data collection methods influences data management and analytic approaches, collection methods for physiological or psycho-social outcomes, the benefits and drawbacks of using public data sets, conventional and new analytic techniques, as well as broader issues in the evolution of quantitative methods. Prerequisites: NRSC 308; NRSC 313; NRSC 352 or NRSC 382; or with permission from instructor(s). [2 credits] FALL



NRSC 310. Health, Healthcare, Research & Public Policy. This course explores and critically analyzes theoretical and empirical approaches to understanding dynamic synergies between research, nursing practice, healthcare organization, and public policy and their impact on health. Strategies for dissemination, translation, and evaluation of evidence-based research findings to support healthcare practices and public policies to measurably improve health outcomes for selected populations and the student's phenomenon of interest will be discussed. Local, national, and global implications will be explored. Prerequisite: enrollment in the PhD program or consent of faculty. [2 credits].



NRSC 311. Role of Scientist in Academe, Community and World. This seminar course assists the student to develop a personal framework for behavior within academe, the scientific community and the world beyond. Through readings and discussions, the student will explore a variety of viewpoints about the duties and responsibilities of an educated citizen scientist in an interdependent world. Prerequisite: enrollment in the PhD program or consent of faculty. [1 credit].



NRSC 312. Programs of Research and Grantsmanship. This course provides the foundational information necessary for developing a program of research. Focus is placed on acquiring practical skills necessary to develop a program of research, narrowing the focus of student's area of research, and for basic grantsmanship. Focus is placed upon developing the knowledge and practical skills necessary to investigate an area of research interest and draft a research grant proposal appropriate to current level of career development needs and/or phenomenon of interest. Prerequisite: enrollment in the PhD program or consent of faculty. [2 credits].


NRSC 313. Theories of Science. This course provides students with an introduction to the central theoretical and philosophical issues concerning the nature of science, the patterns of knowing and knowledge development, criteria for evaluating knowledge claims and philosophy of science. The course will enable students to become knowledgeable about the forces affecting the development of knowledge and critical analyses of theories commonly used in nursing research. Prerequisite: enrollment in the PhD program or consent of faculty. [2 credits].

 

 

NRSC 352. Measurement in Clinical Research. This course examines the principles of measurement, sources of measurement error, and procedures used for critical evaluation of the psychometric properties of clinical measures including techniques for assessing validity and reliability. Selected measures, commonly used in clinical research and specific to student research interests, will be evaluated for psychometric properties and fit with a proposed focus of study. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the PhD Program and completion of NRSC 307 and NRSC 350; or, consent of instructor. [3 credits]



NRSC 368. Contextual Nature of Health and Health Behaviors. This course explores and critically analyzes theoretical and empirical approaches to understanding the interaction of health and environment in affecting health by examining contextual factors that impact health and health behaviors of various system levels. Examines disparity (e.g., social and economic) as a determinant of health among individuals and sub-populations. Critique selected models of health, health behavior, community organization, and health care delivery and their usefulness to understand and impact selected health phenomena and various ethno-cultural populations and communities. Students critically analyze and synthesize the literature related to a selected phenomenon of interest. Prerequisite: enrollment in the PhD program or consent of faculty. [2 credits].



NRSC 379. Non-candidate Research. This course deals with research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. Prerequisite: enrollment in the PhD program or consent of faculty. [Variable credit: 0-6]



NRSC 380. Knowledge Synthesis in Nursing Science. This course provides a critical appraisal of the theoretical and empirical basis of nursing science. Theories and research generated to study phenomena related to nursing are evaluated and synthesized. Strategies for synthesizing extant knowledge in nursing are discussed. Prerequisite: enrollment in the PhD program or consent of faculty. [3 credits].

 

 

NRSC 383. Issues in Health Services Research Intervention Studies. The student will develop expertise in the design and execution of intervention studies in health services research.  Emphasis will be placed on the selection of interventions and the valid and reliable execution of the interventions through examination of issues such as treatment fidelity, intervention duration, location and interventionist expertise.  The intervention categories studied include:  labor, capital and processes (e.g., working conditions and work design). Strategies of attending to the execution and analysis of multilevel, multi-organizational studies will be addressed. [3 credits] 



NRSC 394. Qualitative Research Methods. This course introduces and explores qualitative research methods, including their theoretical and methodological foundations, and practical applications. Course participants will explore and pilot test one method in the context of their topic of interest. Prerequisite: enrollment in the PhD program or consent of faculty. [3 credits] SUMMER



NRSC 395. Research Practicum. This course provides students with exposure to and involvement in the research process. Learning activities are based on student need and interest and determined according to best fit with available faculty research programs. Prerequisite: enrollment in the PhD program or consent of faculty. [Variable credit: 1-3 ].



NRSC 399. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. Prerequisite: enrollment in the PhD program and consent of faculty. [Variable credit: 0-6] [Variable credit: 0-6 ].




Required Courses for Clinical Research Track



NRSC 350. Conceptual Foundations for Clinical Research. Critical analysis of theories, concepts and research related to the promotion, protection and restoration of health across the lifespan at individual, family and community levels. Emphasis will be on the individual level. Students conduct a critical analysis of existing and emerging scientific knowledge in a chosen field of study. Prerequisite: enrollment in the PhD program or consent of faculty. [3 credits].



NRSC 352. Measurement in Clinical Research. This course examines the principles of measurement, procedures used for critical evaluation of clinical measures and specific techniques for assessing validity, reliability, and the structure of measures for use in diverse populations. A variety of behavioral and physiologic measures are included. Development of new and modification of existing instruments are included. Prerequisite: enrollment in the PhD program or consent of faculty. [3 credits].



NRSC 353. Designing and Testing Clinical Interventions. Analysis of methodological, ethical, and practical issues related to the design and implementation of theory-based intervention studies. Students conduct a critical analysis of existing and emerging interventions related to their chosen field of study. Prerequisite: enrollment in the PhD program or consent of faculty. [3 credits].




Additional required courses for Clinical Research Track


6 credits - content related to phenomenon of interest (electives)

These courses will be determined based on the student's specific research area. Approval by the faculty advisor is required. Possible options may include:



Advanced methodological skills
This elective would be concentrated work in developing the student's expertise in the method(s) most needed in their particular area. Although these topics may be touched upon in the general methods courses, mastery of a particular technique requires specialization. Survey development/writing, secondary data analysis, special interviewing skills, cost effectiveness are examples of courses that might be applicable.



Topic Specific
Electives are selected that will support the student's knowledge development in their specific clinical research topical area. These electives may be found in other disciplines such as psychology, women's studies, human organization and development, sociology and economics.




Required Courses for Health Services Track



NRSC 381. Current Topics in Health Services Research. This course is designed to assist the student to develop expertise concerning the objectives, support mechanisms, limitations and controversies of current HSR research initiatives and HSR organizations. Examples of initiatives include (but are not limited to) those of the IOM, governmental and private safety studies, QI/QA consortia, JCAHO, IHI, and other projects. The student will be expected to assess the relative place of her/his research interest in the current HSR environment and to begin to function within the professional role of a health services researcher. Prerequisite: enrollment in the PhD program or consent of faculty. [3 credits].



NRSC 382. Measuring Outcomes: Issues in Health Service Research Designs. In this course, the student will develop expertise in the design, measurement and analysis of studies employing the five generic outcomes of greatest interest in outcomes studies: satisfaction, cost-effectiveness, mortality, health related quality of life, and morbidity. The student will also be expected to develop an overview including measurement and analysis plans for a condition-specific outcome. The impact of the researcher's decisions regarding conceptual models, treatment definition, risk adjustment strategies and the application of statistical techniques will be explored. At least one controversy attendant to each of the five generic outcomes will be debated in class. Prerequisites: completion of Research Design and Statistics I and II. [3 credits].



NRSC 383. Issues in Health Services Research Intervention Studies. The student will develop expertise in the design and execution of intervention studies in health services research. Emphasis will be placed on the selection of interventions and the valid and reliable execution of the interventions through examination of issues such as treatment fidelity, intervention duration, location and interventionist expertise. The intervention categories studied include: labor, capital and processes (e.g., working conditions and work design). Strategies of attending to the execution and analysis of multilevel, multi-organizational studies will be addressed. [3 credits] FALL




Additional required courses for Health Services Research Track


6 credits - content related to phenomenon of interest (electives)

These will be determined based on the student's specific research area. Approval by the faculty is required. Possible options may include:



Advanced methodological skills
This elective would be concentrated work in developing the student's expertise in the method(s) most needed in their particular area. Although these topics may be touched upon in the general methods courses, mastery of a particular technique requires specialization. Survey development/writing, secondary data analysis, special interviewing skills, cost effectiveness are examples of courses that might be applicable.



Topic Specific

Examples of these types of electives are those in economics, sociology and social psychology.

 


Additional PhD Courses
(Note: These courses may not be offered each semester - check for availability)


NRSC 366. Curriculum Strategies for Health Professional Education (required course for students who have received a Nurse Faculty Loan). This course introduces the student to the foundations of learning theory and learning styles. The impact of technology on learning practices and the appropriate use of technology to facilitate learning is emphasized. Students will create electronic elements for effective learning and use a course management system. Copyright and fair use issues are discussed. Overall curriculum strategies that integrate content, organization, informatics, and sequencing of courses are discussed. Students will design a learning program that integrates learning styles, technology use, and a course management system. Prerequisite: enrollment in the PhD program or consent of faculty. [3 credits].

NRSC 367. Educational Evaluation for Learning in the Health Professions. (required course for students who have received a Nurse Faculty Loan).This course is designed to facilitate expertise in the application of fundamental educational concepts, principles, and theories to techniques of educational measurement and evaluation. The underlying premise for the value of such knowledge is that evaluation provides evidence for sound decision-making in programs of higher education. Moreover, students will acquire competence in the planning and development of classroom and clinical performance evaluation tools, as well as analyzing and interpreting test results within the context of current ethical, legal, and social educational guidelines. Prerequisite: enrollment in the PhD program or consent of faculty. [3 credits].

 

NRSC 371. Advanced Concepts in Nursing Education. This course is designed to facilitate expertise in the application of advanced educational concepts, principles, and theories related to nursing education in the academic setting. The underlying premise for the value of such knowledge is that nurse educators encounter situations and issues that warrant systematic consideration—and reflection. Moreover, students will acquire competence in facilitating learner development and role socialization, review accreditation parameters for nursing programs, and explore various aspects and topics such as legal, ethical and socio-cultural factors related to the role of the nurse educator. Pre- requisites: 366, 367. [3]



NRSC 377. Special Topics in Nursing Science. Students will discuss research and current developments of special interest to faculty and students (may be repeated for credit). Prerequisite: enrollment in the PhD program or consent of faculty. [Variable credit 1-3].



NRSC 390. Independent Study in Nursing Science. Individualized study and reading in areas of mutual interest to the student and faculty member. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. [Variable credit: 1-3] [Variable credit: 1-3 ].