Firefox Video Settings

Setting Up Firefox to Save Downloadable Media

By default, Firefox may try to immediately open downloadable lecture videos and audio within the browser, instead of prompting you for a location to save the file.  If you click a media link and it appears that nothing is happening, it probably means that Firefox is waiting for the entire file to download before starting to play it.  To change this behavior, and make Firefox simply save the file for later viewing, follow these instructions.

 

  1. Select “Options” from the “Tools” menu at the top of the screen.



  2. Select the “Applications” tab from the top-middle of the window that appears.  You will see an initially-blank box that will populate with different file types that Firefox recognizes, along with what it does whenever it encounters that type of file.



  3. Type “mp4” (no quotes) in the search box at the top.  You may get several different MPEG-4 items listed; you only need to make sure the (audio/mp4) and (video/mp4) items are present.



  4. For each of those items, click the action on the right side of the screen so a drop-down menu appears.  Select “Save File” for each one.



  5. Click “OK” at the bottom of the screen, then close and re-open Firefox to make sure the settings have taken effect.  When you click on a downloadable video/audio link from now on, you should see a “Downloads” window appear with an estimate of time remaining for your download.  By default, Firefox saves all downloaded files to your My Documents\Downloads folder.

Manually Saving Downloadable Files/Viewing Streaming Videos

If you would prefer not subscribing to a downloadable lecture feed through iTunes or another program, you can save lectures manually through the direct link itself.  Accessing streaming links is also done directly through this main link.  You must first make sure your browser is set to view RSS feeds (XML) directly.

 

  1. Follow steps 1 and 2 from the “Setting Up Firefox to Save Downloadable Media” above to view Firefox application information.
  2. Type “web feed” (no quotes) in the search bar at the top.
  3. Click the action on the right side so a drop-down menu appears, and select “Preview in Firefox” for the action.
  4. Type “podcast” (no quotes) in the search bar at the top.  You should see items for both “Podcast” and “Video Podcast”.
  5. Select “Preview in Firefox” under the “Action” menu box for both these items.
  6. Click OK at the bottom.  Restart Firefox to make sure the settings take effect.

Manually Downloading Video/Audio

  1. If you have not done so, follow the steps above under “Setting Up Firefox to Save Downloadable Media”.
  2. From your course’s main media link, click the link to the audio/video feed you wish to view.  This will bring you to a list of currently-available lecture files for the selected course.
  3. The name of the file appears in an enclosure titled “Media files” under the heading and description of that particular lecture.  You may either click the link directly, or right-click the link and choose “Save Link As…” (“Download Link As…” in Safari) from the menu that appears.  Note: If you do not see an enclosure with a file name embedded within it, the lecture you are trying to view is *NOT* downloadable and can only be streamed from our servers.  Follow the steps in the next section to view the streaming lecture properly.
  4. If you choose to right-click on the file to save it, you will be prompted with a dialog box asking where to save the file.  By default, it will ask if you want to save in the folder where Firefox saves all it’s downloads.  Choose a place on your computer and click “Save”.

Accessing Streaming Video

  1. From your course’s main media link, click the link to the audio/video feed you wish to view.  This will bring you to a list of currently-available lecture files for the selected course.
  2. Click the title of the course (usually “Lecture X”, where X is the session number) you wish to view.  You will be taken to a Flash video page.
  3. Click the play button in the video window to view the lecture.  Note: if you experience *ANY* problems at all viewing your lecture, a likely culprit is your Flash player within your browser needs to be updated.  This can be done for free by going to http://www.adobe.com and selecting “Adobe Flash Player” on the right side of the screen.  Adobe will walk you through the rest of the process, which generally only takes a couple of minutes.