Academic Resources

Course Descriptions

Explanation of Symbols

200-level: Generalist nursing or upper-level pre-nursing courses
300-level: Specialist nursing courses

The University reserves the right to change the arrangement or content of courses, to change the texts and other materials used, or to cancel any course on the basis of insufficient enrollment or for any other reason.

 



Pre-Nursing Courses

150. Introduction to Microbiology. This course presents a basic introduction to microbiology with particular emphasis on the diversity of bacteria and viruses. Biological and chemical principles necessary to understand the genetics and metabolism of microorganisms will be presented. Pathogenesis, host immune defense mechanisms, and the rationale for the use of antimicrobial drugs will be described. Bacterial genetics and recombinant DNA technologies will be introduced. [3-4] Spring BACK


231A. Introduction to Nutrition. This course is designed to assist the student in building a foundation of knowledge which may be used to evaluate nutrition information from varied sources as well as apply nutrition fundamentals to personal and population dietary recommendations. Nutrition research will be integrated with the basic principles of digestion and absorption, the role of specific nutrients in health and illness, and the role of nutrition throughout the lifespan. Topics to be addressed will include nutrition and physical fitness, weight control and energy balance, nutrition and health promotion, and nutrition programs and services available throughout the U.S. public health system. [2] Fall and Spring BACK


231B. Nutrition and Health: Issues and Insights. This course is designed to complement N231A to assist the student in building a foundation of knowledge used to evaluate nutrition information from varied sources and apply that knowledge to personal lifestyle and dietary choices. N231B will expand upon nutrition topics introduced in N231A, explore new nutrition related topics, and examine contemporary nutrition controversies. Students will have the opportunity to apply nutrition fundamentals to health promotion and disease prevention for themselves and others. N231B will introduce students to the evaluation of nutrition research, interventions, and recommendations through use of an evidence-based medicine approach. Current research and topics of interest to be addressed will include nutrition concepts as related to life-style diseases (heart disease, cancer, obesity); dietary supplements; vegetarian diets; health implications of alcohol use and abuse; food allergies and intolerances; determinants of eating behavior; weight regulation and disordered eating; and nutrition/health issues unique to a college age population. Pre/corequisite: 231A. [1] Fall and Spring BACK


210A. Human Anatomy and Physiology I. Integrative study of human anatomy and physiology. The course emphasizes normal structure and function of body systems and homeostatic control mechanisms, with discussion of alterations in normal function that occur with pathological conditions. Material covered includes cell biology and biochemistry, integument, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. Prerequisite: college-level biology and chemistry or permission of the instructor. [4] Fall BACK


210B. Human Anatomy and Physiology II. Integrative study of human anatomy and physiology. This course is a continuation of NURS 210A. Emphasis on normal structure and function of body systems and homeostatic control mechanisms, with discussion of alterations in normal function that occur with pathological conditions. Material covered includes the sensory, endocrine, immune, cardiovascular, pulmonary, digestive, renal and reproductive systems. Prerequisite: NURS 210A or permission of the instructor. [4] Spring BACK


Generalist Nursing Courses and Electives

215. Foundations for Professional Nursing Role Development I. This course is the first of a three-course sequence addressing professional nursing development providing both foundational and conceptual evidence based context for the provision of nursing care. This course serves as an introduction to professional nursing, exploring the historical beginnings, organization and structure of the profession, and professional role identity, as well as an introduction to a process of research appraisal for use in evidence based practice. With guidance, students will analyze and synthesize information from a variety of sources related to professional nursing. Corequisite: 220, 225,235, 245, 255A. [2] Fall BACK


216. Foundations for Professional Nursing Role Development II. This course is the second of a three-course sequence addressing professional nursing development designed to further conceptual foundations and contexts for provision of evidence based nursing care. The course focuses on evidence based practice question development, project design and implementation strategies, as well as professional leadership and advocacy. With guidance, students will analyze and synthesize information from a variety of sources related to professional nursing. Prerequisite: 215, 220, 225, 235, 245, 255A. Corequisite: 226, 236, 246, 255B. [2] Spring BACK


217. Foundations for Professional Nursing Role Development III. This course is the third of a three-course sequence addressing professional nursing development designed to facilitate transition to practice and management of professional issues that reflect the current complexity in provision of care with respect to ethics, advocacy, and accountability. Building upon previous courses in the series, students will continue with evidence based practice development, evaluation and dissemination. With guidance, students will analyze and synthesize information from a variety of sources related to professional nursing. Prerequisite: 215, 216, 220, 225, 226, 235,236, 245, 246, 255A, 255B. Corequisite: 227, 237, 247A, 247B, 256. [2] Summer BACK


218A. Conceptual Basis for Nursing Practice. This course focuses on identification of the unique strengths/perceptions of each RN student and a development of an individualized plan for learning. The course assists RN students in identifying and developing strategies to foster critical thinking, lifelong learning, and nursing practice role development. Theory development and research are introduced as processes essential to the organization and development of nursing knowledge. Limited to RN students. [3] Fall BACK


218B. Foundations of Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing. This course is the second of a two-course sequence addressing professional nursing. The student in this course will identify, evaluate, and engage the various steps of scholarly inquiry in order to address research problems related to professional nursing practice. Students also will explore the theoretical and research foundations for evidence-based practice in nursing. Prerequisite: 218A. Limited to RN students. [3] Spring BACK


219. Nursing Ethics Seminar. This seminar course addresses basic ethical principles and healthcare issues that promote ethical reflection. Using student-selected case studies, ethical dilemmas in health care are discussed. Students are expected to reflect on their personal values and beliefs, ethical principles, clinical experiences, and literature sources while discussing the case studies. Prerequisite: 218A, Limited to RN students. [3] Spring BACK


220. Principles of Client-Centered Care. This course is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to gain the knowledge, skill, and attitudes essential to the provision of nursing care that focuses on the client¿s individual needs, desires, and capacities with the goal of achieving the best possible client outcome. Learners will engage in assessment of and reflection on self and system capacities in order to be competent to deliver client-centered care. Corequisite: 215, 225, 235, 245, 255A. [1] Fall BACK


225. Enhancement of Community and Population Health I. This course is the first in a sequence of three clinical practice courses designed to provide the student with an opportunity to explore population-and community-based health care principles that impact the client. Healthy People 2020 will be used as a framework to determine the health status of the community. Notably, the course will provide the student knowledge on how the social determinants of health impact the health of the community. In addition, resources will be discussed in relation to the availability, barriers, and access in the community. The community clinical experience is designed to provide the student the opportunity to work within a community organization or agency to assess and identify specific challenges to maximizing the health of persons in communities and populations. Corequisite: 215, 220, 235, 245, 255A. [2] Fall BACK


226. Enhancement of Community and Population Health II. This course is the second in a sequence of three clinical practice courses designed to provide the student with an opportunity to explore population and community based health care principles that impact the client. This course will provide the student with an opportunity to use evidence-based practice to enhance the knowledge base regarding factors that impact the client¿s health status within the community and population. This course will focus on how evidence-based practice may be used to increase healthy lifespans, decrease discrepancies in health status and improve health outcomes. The course explores population-based care models and environments in which health care is delivered: community agencies, clinics, neighborhoods/communities, schools, the family, and the workplace. Prerequisite: 215, 220, 225, 235, 245, 255A. Corequisite: 216, 236, 246, 255B. [3] Spring BACK


227. Enhancement of Community and Population Health III. This course is the third in a sequence of three clinical practice courses designed to provide the student with an opportunity to explore population- and community-based health care principles that impact the client. This course addresses healthcare systems related issues that impact the client's ability to maintain and maximize health. Students will have the opportunity to build on their knowledge of clients within communities and populations, collaborate to synthesize and evaluate data, identify appropriate programs, and disseminate findings. Prerequisite: 215, 216, 220, 225, 226, 235,236, 245, 246, 255A, 255B. Corequisite: 217, 237, 247A, 247B, 256. [2] Summer BACK


228. Population-Based Health Care. This course provides the student with an opportunity to explore population-based health care principles of prevention, health maintenance and health promotion within the context of Healthy People 2010. Notably, the course will focus on how these principles are used to increase healthy lifespan, decrease discrepancies in health status and health outcomes for different populations and assure access to preventive services for all. It emphasizes epidemiologic principles and population-based holistic health promotion/disease prevention as an integral part of populations at risk for illness, disability, or premature death. Further, the course explores population-based care models and environments in which health care is delivered: community agencies, neighborhoods/communities, schools, the family, and the workplace. Legislation and policy implications for primary, secondary, and tertiary care will be discussed. Limited to RN students. [2] Fall BACK


229. Health Care Systems. This is a course that addresses health care systems and their related issues. Course content focuses on leadership and decision making theory, team building, communication, and managerial skills. The course also provides information on contemporary trends in the organization and delivery of health care to individuals, families, and populations. Quality improvement and legal issues from a managerial perspective will also be discussed in this course. In addition, course content will include the impact of managed care and financial pressures on health care providers along with outcomes management, financial management, conflict resolution, and economic principles pertinent to the delivery of health care services. Prerequisite: 228. Limited to RN students. [3] Spring BACK


235. Human Experience of Health and Illness Across the Lifespan I. Nursing 235 is the first of three didactic courses examining the human experience of health and illness across the lifespan from infancy through senescence. The framework incorporates the following concepts and their influence on health and response to illness: growth and development, mental health, gender, lifestyle, value systems, spirituality, ethnicity, environment, and psychosocial, economic, and cultural issues. The impact of these factors on individuals, families, and aggregates will be explored. Basic concepts/knowledge of selected interventions will be introduced. Selected health problems involving the sensory, hematological, endocrine, renal/urinary, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems will be presented; the epidemiology, pathophysiology, medical management (select pharmacologic, non-pharmacologic, and surgical), and nursing management will be addressed. Health promotion, including primary, secondary, and tertiary, anticipatory guidance, and patient education will be discussed. Corequisite: 215, 220, 225, 245, 255A. [4] Fall BACK


236. Human Experience of Health and Illness Across the Lifespan II. Nursing 236 is the second of three didactic courses examining the human experience of health and illness across the lifespan from infancy through senescence, including the childbearing cycle. The framework incorporates the following concepts and their influence on health and response to illness: growth and development, mental health, gender, lifestyle, value systems, spirituality, ethnicity, environment, and psychosocial, economic, and cultural issues. The impact of these factors on individuals, families, and aggregates will be explored. Basic concepts/knowledge of selected interventions will be introduced. Selected health problems involving mental health disorders with appropriate treatment modalities and settings, gastrointestinal, reproductive (including maternity focus) systems, and care of the client with cancer will be presented. The epidemiology, pathophysiology, medical management (non-pharmacologic, and surgical), and nursing management will be addressed. Health promotion, including primary, secondary, and tertiary, anticipatory guidance, and patient education will be discussed. Prerequisite: 215, 220, 225, 235, 245, 255A. Corequisite: 216, 226, 246, 255B. [5] Spring BACK


237. Human Experience of Health and Illness Across the Lifespan III. This is the third of three didactic courses examining the human experience of health and illness across the lifespan¿from infancy through senescence with an emphasis on increasing complex acute and chronic issues. The course provides the student with the theoretical basis to apply principles of chronic illness, including assessment and intervention skills, to at-risk populations. The impact of multi-system factors on individuals, families, and aggregates or populations/communities will be explored. The epidemiology, pathophysiology, medical management (pharmacologic, non-pharmacologic, and surgical), and nursing management for selected health problems will be addressed. Health promotion, anticipatory guidance, and patient education will be discussed. Prerequisite: 215, 216, 220, 225, 226, 235, 236, 245, 246, 255A, 255B. Corequisite: 217, 227, 247A, 247B, 256. [Prerequisites and corequisites apply to non-R.N. students only.] [4] Fall and Summer BACK


245. Fundamentals of Clinical Practice. This course is the first in a sequence of three clinical practice courses. The course is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to acquire the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to apply the nursing process (assessment, analysis, planning, intervention, and evaluation) in the delivery of client-centered nursing care. Students will learn and practice assessment and intervention skills in a didactic classroom setting and in a simulated laboratory setting and progress to full application of the nursing process in an adult medical-surgical clinical setting with maximum faculty guidance. Corequisite: 215, 220, 225, 235, 255A. [5] Fall BACK


246. Integration of Theoretical and Clinical Aspects of Nursing I. This course is the second of a sequence of three clinical practice courses. It is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to integrate theory, practice, and evidence in the application of the nursing process in a clinical setting for diverse client aggregate populations across the lifespan (child-bearing families/newborn health, pediatric and adolescent health, adult and older adult health, and psychiatric/mental health). Students will analyze and integrate aggregate specific concepts in the provision of client-centered care in a variety of health care settings with moderate faculty guidance. Prerequisite: 215, 220, 225, 235, 245, 255A. Corequisite: 216, 226, 236, 255B. [3] Spring BACK


247A. Integration of Theoretical and Clinical Aspects of Nursing II. This course is the final rotation of the second in the sequence of three clinical practice courses. This course is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to integrate theory, practice, and evidence in the application of the nursing process in a clinical setting for diverse client aggregate populations across the life span (child-bearing families/newborn health, pediatric and adolescent health, adult and older adult health, and psychiatric/mental health). Students will analyze and integrate aggregate specific concepts in the provision of client-centered care in variety of health care settings with moderate faculty guidance. Prerequisite: 215, 216, 220, 225, 226, 235, 236, 245, 246, 255A, 255B. Corequisite: 217, 227, 237, 247B, 256. [1] Summer BACK


247B. Capstone Clinical Practicum. This course is the third in a sequence of three clinical practice courses. This course is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to synthesize theory, practice, and evidence in the application of the nursing process for multiple complex adult medical-surgical clients. Students will synthesize acquired knowledge, skills, and attitudes to prevent illness and promote health, prioritize and delegate nursing care, and engage as leaders within the inter-professional health care team to meet the needs of clients on the continuum of health. Prerequisite: 215, 216, 220, 225, 226, 235, 236, 245, 246, 255A, 255B. Corequisite: 217, 227, 237, 247A, 256. [2] Summer BACK


248. Basic Health Assessment. This course is designed to provide the RN student the opportunity to learn and practice the skills of assessment in a classroom, laboratory setting, and then in a clinical area for a variety of client populations across the life span. The student's specialty population will be considered in the choice of health care setting utilized for practice. Limited to RN students. [3] Fall BACK


249. Integration of Theoretical and Clinical Aspects of Community Health Nursing. This course is an introduction to the scope and practice of family and community health nursing. It emphasizes, through didactic and community practice, the promotion and maintenance of the health of diverse populations across the lifespan. The epidemiological process and the nursing process serve as the organizing framework for didactic content and clinical interventions to support family and community health. Social, cultural, economic, environmental, and ethical issues related to specific populations will be explored. Limited to RN students. Prerequisite: 228, 248; corequisite: 229. [3] Spring BACK


251. Independent Study - Non Clinical. Ind Study - Non Clinical [1-6] BACK


255A. Pharmacology for Nursing Care I. This course presents an introduction to pharmacologic knowledge, the clinical indications for drug use as a treatment modality, and the role of the nurse in drug therapy. The course will present content on the prototype drug from major drug classifications that serves as a framework for continued self-study of new drug information. Emphasis will be placed on major drug classifications and their respective prototype drug(s) that are more commonly encountered in drug therapy. Corequisite: 215, 220, 225, 235, 245. [2] Fall BACK


255B. Pharmacology for Nursing Care II. This course extends and builds upon pharmacological knowledge from earlier pharmacology courses and the Health and Illness Across the Lifespan series. The focus of the course is drug therapy most commonly seen in specific clinical settings and specific patient situations. The course presents a context for safe drug administration and for continued self-study of new drug information. Emphasis is placed on pharmacological interventions to achieve safe and optimal patient outcomes. Prerequisite: 215, 220, 225, 235, 245, 255A. Corequisite: 216, 226, 236, 246. [2] Spring BACK


256. Pharmacology for Nursing Care III. This course extends and builds upon pharmacologic knowledge from earlier pharmacology courses and the Health and Illness Across the Lifespan series. The focus of the course is the variations of drug therapy in complex situations. The course presents cases of complex drug regimens for analysis and evaluation by the student. Emphasis will be placed on pharmacological interventions to achieve safe and optimal patient outcomes in specific situations. Prerequisite: 215, 216, 220, 225, 226, 235, 236, 245, 246, 255A, 255B. Corequisite: 217, 227, 237, 247A, 247B. [1] Summer BACK


257. The Nurse as a Teacher and Facilitator of Learning. This course expands on the RN students' current knowledge and skills in patient education. The course addresses the professional nurse's role as a facilitator of learning for patients, families, and fellow nurses. The RN student applies concepts and processes, such as motivation, improvement process, change, and the teaching and learning process to his or her personal and professional nurse roles. Limited to RN students. [2] Fall BACK


3000. [Clinical Continuation]. MSN, post-master's certificate, or DNP students enroll in this course to resolve an incomplete grade in a prior semester's clinical course. Enrollment in the course is considered to carry at least half-time status. Tuition is charged at a rate of 0.5 credit hour plus liability insurance. Students may enroll in this course no more than twice. Offered as needed. [0] Fall, Spring, Summer BACK


304B. Nurse-Midwifery Role Synthesis, Exploration, and Analysis. Nurse midwives, as advanced practice nurses, are viewed as potential national and international leaders in health care and managers of clinical practices. Successful practice is based on understanding management principles and interpersonal, interdisciplinary and organizational relationships. This course provides opportunity to analyze and interpret organizational structures and the dynamics of NMW practice. Study of the "work" and financial management of NMW practices is provided through case study discussion. Students will complete a project to analyze management principles and interpersonal, interdisciplinary and organizational relationships identified in a business structure for practice, extrapolate components organizational behavior, and develop strategies to address practice realities, needs and/or dilemmas. The American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) Core Competencies for Basic Midwifery Practice (including Hallmarks of Midwifery and Midwifery Management Process), Standards for Midwifery Practice, and Code of Ethics provide the base to analyze issues inherent in clinical practice. Prerequisite: 305b, 309a, 327a, 330, 331, 333, 334, 335, 336, 337, 338 or permission of the Nurse-Midwifery program director. Corequisite: 339 or permission of the Nurse-Midwifery program director. [2] Fall BACK


305A. Advanced Health Assessment and Clinical Reasoning. This course is the foundational didactic course for NP and nurse midwifery practice. Students differentiate abnormal from normal findings using advanced assessment techniques, interpret diagnostic study results, and use clinical reasoning to formulate diagnoses for culturally diverse individuals. Students interpret data and problem solve utilizing case studies and surrogate patients. Health promotion and disease prevention strategies are discussed. Prerequisite: Admission to specialty and graduate level standing. [3] Fall BACK


305B(a). Advanced Health Assessment Applications for Acute Care Nurse Practitioners. This course builds on knowledge of advanced health assessment with a focus on clients commonly seen in the acute care practice setting. Advanced health assessment skills include obtaining appropriate health histories and performing physical examinations on adult patients with complex problems, in a variety of acute and chronic healthcare settings, as well as participating in direct patient care. In addition, the course emphasizes proper documentation of data obtained from the history and physical exams and the development of appropriate differential diagnoses, problem lists, and therapeutic plans of care. Pre/co-requisite: 305a, graduate-level standing, admission to the specialty. Fall BACK


305B(b). Advanced Health Assessment Applications for the Adult Nurse Practitioner. This course builds on a knowledge of advanced health assessment, with a focus on clients commonly seen in the adult practice setting. Advanced health assessment techniques are emphasized. Diverse approaches are used in expanding proficiency in conducting histories and physical examinations in clinical laboratory settings with adult clients. Communication techniques unique to the specialty population are emphasized. Systematic and organized health assessments that are sensitive to cultural and developmental needs of adults are explored. Students are introduced to the dynamics of the managed health care environment. Experienced adult nurse practitioners serve as role models in clinical practice. Pre/co-requisite: 305a, graduate level standing, admission to the specialty. Fall BACK


305B(c). Advanced Health Assessment Applications for the Family Nurse Practitioner. This course builds on knowledge of advanced health assessment, with a focus on clients commonly seen in the family practice setting. Advanced health assessment techniques are emphasized. Diverse types of approaches are used in expanding proficiency in conducting histories and physical examinations in laboratory and clinical settings. Communication techniques unique to the specialty population are emphasized. Systematic and organized health assessments that are sensitive to cultural and developmental needs are explored. Students are introduced to the dynamics of the managed health care environment. Experienced family nurse practitioners serve as role models in clinical practice. Pre/co-requisite: 305a, graduate level standing, admission to the specialty. Fall BACK


305B(d). Advanced Health Assessment and Applications for Nurse-Midwifery. This course builds on a knowledge of advanced health assessment with a focus on clients commonly seen in the nurse-midwifery practice setting. Techniques, including communication skills, used in assessment of the health status of women and the fetus are developed and refined in laboratory and clinical settings. Congruence of philosophical concepts among the profession, school, and the program is introduced. The American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) Core Competencies for Basic Midwifery Practice (including Hallmarks of Midwifery and Midwifery Management Process), Standards for Midwifery Practice, and Code of Ethics provide the basis for clinical actions. Pre/co-requisite: 305a, graduate level standing, admission to the specialty. Fall BACK


305B(f). Advanced Health Assessment Applications for the Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner. This course builds on knowledge of advanced health assessment with a focus on comorbid physical and psychiatric conditions commonly seen in psychiatric-mental health settings, with an emphasis on expanding proficiency in conducing histories and physical examinations. Systematic and organized health assessments related to identification of comorbidity and interrelationship of physical and psychiatric conditions and treatements are explored. Experienced PMH practitioners, psychiatrists and oher relate providers serve as role models in clinical practice. The course emphasizes the integration of health ass3ssment strategies that are sensitive to the psychosocial needs of mental health clients. Pre/co-requisite: 305a, graduate level standing, admission to the PMHNP specialty. Spring BACK


305B(g). Advanced Health Assessment Application. Advanced techniques used in assessment of the health status of women are taught. Students in this course have the opportunity to enhance and refine their assessment and diagnostic skills in a laboratory setting. Diverse applications are used to expand proficiency in history taking and health assessment techniques specifically directed at the health care of women, to include antepartum surveillance. Pre/co-requisite: 305a, graduate level standing, admission to the specialty. Fall 1 Daddario and Staff 305b(H) Advanced Health Assessment Applications for the Family & Acute Care Nurse Practitioner This course builds on knowledge of advanced health assessment, with a focus on clients commonly seen in the family practice setting. Advanced health assessment techniques are emphasized. Diverse types of approaches are used in expanding proficiency in conducting histories and physical examinations in laboratory and clinical settings. Communication techniques unique to the specialty population are emphasized. Systematic and organized health assessments that are sensitive to cultural and developmental needs are explored. Students are introduced to the dynamics of the managed health care environment. Experienced nurse practitioners serve as role models in clinical practice. Fall BACK


305C. Advanced Neonatal Health Assessment. This course provides opportunities for students to develop the knowledge and skills needed to perform a comprehensive health and gestational age assessment. Data to collect when eliciting a health history, principles of performing a physical and gestational age assessment, diagnostic study interpretations, and examination techniques are stressed in the didactic portion of the course. Critical thinking is emphasized as the basis for synthesis of knowledge regarding the performance of a health histories, physical assessments, and identification of potential diagnostic tests for alterations in clinical findings. Emphasis is placed on the recognition of assessment findings that deviate from normal. A seven-week supervised clinical experience in the regular newborn nursery and/or a Level II Neonatal Intensive Care Unit provides students with opportunities to perform health histories, health assessments and gestational age assessments with both normal and preterm infants. [3] Fall BACK


305D. Advanced Health Assessment and Clinical Reasoning. Students differentiate abnormal from normal findings using advanced assessment techniques, interpret diagnostic study results and use clinical reasoning to formulate diagnoses for culturally diverse pediatric patients. Synthesizing a systematic, organized, family-centered health assessment that is sensitive to growth and development needs is emphasized. Health promotion and disease prevention strategies are discussed. Pre/corequisite: 305E or 305G, 308. [2] Fall BACK


305E. Advanced Health Assessment Applications for the Primary Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner. This course builds on knowledge of advanced health assessment with focus on clients commonly seen in the pediatric practice setting. Techniques, including communication skills, used to assess the health status of children and adolescents are enhanced and refined. Diverse clinical experiences are used to develop proficiency in history taking and health assessment techniques with infants, children, and adolescents within the context of family-centered care. Synthesizing a systematic and organized health assessment that is sensitive to growth and developmental needs and which will provide the most pertinent data with the least risk to the infant and child-adolescent is emphasized. Corequisite: 305D. [1] Fall BACK


305F. Adv Health Assessment and Clinical Reasoning. Students differentiate abnormal from normal findings using advanced assessment techniques, interpret diagnostic study results, and use clinical reasoning to formulate diagnoses for culturally diverse adults and older adults. Students interpret data and problem solve utilizing case studies and surrogate patients. Health promotion and disease prevention strategies are discussed. Prerequisite: Admission to specialty and graduate level standing. [3] Fall BACK


305G. Advanced Health Assessment Applications for the Acute Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner. This course builds on knowledge of advanced health assessment with focus on clients commonly seen in pediatric practice settings. Techniques, including communication skills, used to assess the health status of children and adolescents are enhanced and refined. Diverse clinical experiences are used to develop proficiency in history taking and health assessment techniques with infants, children, and adolescents within the context of family-centered care. Synthesizing a systematic and organized health assessment that is sensitive to growth and developmental needs and will provide the most pertinent data with the least risk to the infant and child/adolescent is emphasized. Pre/corequisite: 305D, 308, 311, 312A. [1] Fall BACK


306A. Advanced Physiology and Pathophysiology. This course provides in-depth discussion of complex physiologic and pathophysiologic concepts essential for advanced clinical nursing courses in acute care of adults and older adults. Physiologic and pathophysiologic processes related to the central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous systems; cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems; hematopoiesis, inflammation, immunity, microcirculation, neuromuscular synapse, skeletal and smooth muscle, and acid-base balance are discussed at biochemical, cellular, organ, system, and human organism levels. Hormonal regulation is integrated with various physiologic and pathophysiologic processes. Emphasis is on integration of concepts as a basis for understanding interrelationships among complex physiologic and pathophysiologic processes. Prerequisite: Courses in undergraduate level human anatomy and physiology. [4] Fall BACK


306B. Reproductive Anatomy and Physiology. Normal anatomy and physiologic processes of reproduction, including changes during the maternity cycle, are studied. Selected physiologic processes associated with healthy women across the lifespan, human genetics, development of the products of conception, the maternity cycle and the implications for client adaptations are examined. [2] Fall BACK


306C. Developmental/Neonatal Physiology. This course provides an in-depth examination of human genetics, embryologic development and normal physiologic functioning of developing body systems. Mechanisms involved in cell division, gametogenesis, and inheritance patterns are addressed. The structural and functional development of fetal systems, during critical periods, is emphasized. Abnormalities and alterations in fetal development are explored. Environmental factors that influence the structural and functional development of fetal systems are discussed. Long-term clinical implications of alterations in structure and physiologic functioning are also addressed. The legal, ethical and financial implications of genetic therapy, in-vitro fertilization and long-term care of infants with genetic abnormalities are discussed. Prerequisite: Graduate level standing and admission to the Neonatal Nurse Practitioner specialty-level courses. Can be taken as a special student with permission of the instructor. [3] Fall BACK


307. Advanced Pharmacotherapeutics. This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge of pharmacokinetics that will enable the student to safely and appropriately select pharmacologic agents for the management of common acute and chronic health problems of diverse populations. Specific content of the course covers representative drugs of a pharmacologic group, indications for use, drug selection, titration of dose, key adverse effects, and monitoring of therapy and alternative therapy. [3] Fall and Spring BACK


307C. Advanced Pharmacotherapeutics. This course builds on knowledge of the basic principles of pharmacology to establish a knowledge base for clinical judgments in the pharmacologic management and evaluation of adults and older adults as related to the role of Acute Care Nurse Practitioners. Drug interactions, incompatibilities, side effects, and contraindications are discussed. Appropriate patient education is integrated. Pre/corequisite: 306A. [3] Fall BACK


307D. Advanced Neonatal Pharmacotherapeutics. This course provides students preparing for roles within the Neonatal Nurse Practitioner specialty with knowledge of the pharmacotherapeutics for common classifications of drugs used to care for neonates and infants. The physiologic action of selected prescription drugs, unexpected client responses and major untoward effects encountered in diseases of the neonates are discussed. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles, their clinical application and the use of pharmacologic agents in the prevention of illness and the restoration and maintenance of health are emphasized. Emphasis is placed on indications for correct drug choice, usual dose, routes of administration, pharmacological mechanisms in association with drug interactions, adverse effects; and contraindications for use are included. Discussions of clinical judgments in the management and evaluation of pharmacologic therapeutic agents for neonatal use are emphasized. Prerequisite: Graduate level standing and admission to the NNP specialty. Can be taken as a special student with permission of the instructor. [3] Spring BACK


307E. Advanced Pharmacotherapeutics. This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge of pharmacokinetics that will enable the student to safely and appropriately select pharmacologic agents (prescription and over the counter) for the management of common acute and chronic health problems of pediatric clients. Specific content of the course covers representative drugs of a pharmacologic group, indications for use, drug selection, titration of dose, key adverse effects, and monitoring of therapy and alternative therapy. Prerequisite: Graduate level standing; admission to the Pediatric Nurse Practitioner program; Corequisites: 305D, 305E, 308. [3] Spring BACK


308. Pathophysiologic Concepts. This course builds on pre-acquired knowledge of normal human anatomy and physiology. Classic and current research findings form the basis for analysis of pathophysiologic processes and their effect on individual and multiple body systems. Students analyze the effect and progression of selected disease entities in diverse populations across the lifespan. The course provides a foundation for clinical assessment, diagnosis and management of clients experiencing alterations or risks of alterations in their health status. Pre/corequisite: Courses in normal human anatomy and physiology. [3] Fall and Spring BACK


309A. Advanced Practice Nursing in Primary Care of the Adult. This course is designed to provide students with knowledge needed to assess and manage common acute and chronic health problems in the adult population. Multidimensional interventions are discussed (e.g., culturally and environmentally sensitive; health promoting). Pre/corequisite: 305A. [3] Fall and Spring BACK


309B. Advanced Practice Nursing in Primary Care of the Child. This course presents knowledge necessary for the practice of primary health care of children. Course content includes the principles of health promotion, disease prevention and assessment, and management of common primary health care problems in diverse pediatric populations. Emphasis is placed on developmental needs and the pathophysiologic processes underlying certain conditions. The impact of the family on the health of the child is explored. Students are introduced to the dynamics of the managed care environment. Prerequisite: 305A. [2] Spring BACK


309C. Advanced Practice Nursing in Primary Care of the Adolescent. This didactic course presents knowledge that is necessary for the practice of primary health care nursing of adolescents. Course content includes the principles of health promotion, disease prevention and assessment, and management of common primary health care problems in diverse adolescent populations. Emphasis is placed on developmental needs and the pathophysiologic processes underlying certain conditions. The impact of the family on the health of the adolescent is explored. Students are introduced to the dynamics of the managed care environment. Pre/corequisite: 305A. [1] Fall and Spring BACK


309D. Advanced Practice Nursing in Primary Care of the Elderly. In this didactic course, knowledge is presented that is necessary for the practice of primary health care nursing of the elderly. Course content includes the principles of health promotion, disease prevention and assessment, and management of common primary health care problems in diverse elderly populations. Emphasis is placed on developmental needs and the pathophysiologic processes underlying certain conditions. The impact of the family on the health of the elderly is explored. Students are introduced to the dynamics of the managed care environment. Prerequisite: 305A. [1] Spring BACK


309E. Advanced Practice Nursing in the Primary Care of the Woman. This didactic course presents the knowledge that is necessary for the practice of primary care of the female patient by advanced practice nurses. Course content includes the principles of health promotion, disease prevention and assessment, and the management of common primary health care problems in the female population. Emphasis is placed on management of women's health issues in a general, primary care setting. Pre/corequisite: 305A. [1] Spring BACK


310A. Adult Gerontology Primary Care I. This course is designed to provide students with knowledge needed to assess and manage common acute and chronic health problems in the adult population. Multidimensional interventions are discussed (e.g., culturally and environmentally sensitive, health promoting). Pre/corequisite: 305A. [3] Fall BACK


310B. Adult Gerontology Primary Care II. This course is designed to provide students with knowledge needed to assess and manage less common acute and chronic diseases and health problems in the adult and geriatric population. Multidimensional interventions are discussed (e.g., culturally and environmentally sensitive care, health promotion, symptom palliation). Prerequisite: 305A, 310A; Pre/corequisite: 308. [3] Spring BACK


310C. Advanced Concepts in the Care of the Elderly. This didactic course presents the advanced concepts in the care of the elderly patient. Students examine selected age-related changes, disease processes and co-morbidities. Pathophysiology, clinical presentations, interventions, and outcomes are identified. This course integrates the principles of health promotion, disease prevention and rehabilitation. Emphasis is placed on developmental needs and the pathophysiologic processed underlying certain conditions. The impact of the family on the health of the elderly is explored. Students are introduced to the dynamics of the managed care environment. Prerequisite: 305A, 310A; Pre/corequisite: 307. [2] Spring BACK


310D. Concepts of Mental Health for Adults. This didactic course presents common mental health disorders seen in primary care settings within the scope of practice of the AGNP. This course identifies pathophysiology, clinical presentations, interventions, and outcomes of common mental health disorders in adult and geriatric patients. Importance is placed on early screening, diagnosis, treatment and referrals. The reciprocal relationship of mental and physical health is emphasized. Pre/corequisite: 305A, 307, 308, 310A. [1] Fall and Summer BACK


311. Health Promotion of Behavior Development: Birth through Adolescence. This course focuses on the theoretical basis for pediatric advanced nursing practice emphasizing the development of the child and adolescent as an individual within the context of family and society. Using a family-centered approach, this course considers factors, techniques and research which facilitate or interfere with healthy development. Emphasis is placed on developing strategies for providing appropriate anticipatory guidance, health promotion, and disease prevention interventions within the life course. Pre/corequisite: None. [3] Fall BACK


312A. Advanced Practice Nursing in Pediatric Primary Care-Part I. This is the first course in a two-part pediatric primary care didactic course sequence. Information is presented that is necessary for the practice of primary health care nursing of children and adolescents. Course content includes information related to the principles of health promotion, disease prevention, and assessment and management of common primary health care problems in children and adolescents by pediatric nurse practitioners. Content is presented within a family-centered and developmental perspective and includes content related to advanced pathophysiology, research, psychosocial factors, and ethical considerations. Prerequisite: Graduate level standing, admission to the Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Program; corequisite: 305D, 305E or 305G, 308, 311. [3] Fall BACK


312B. Advanced Practice Nursing in Pediatric Primary Care-Part II. In this second part of the pediatric primary care didactic course sequence, information is presented that is necessary for the practice of primary health care nursing of children and adolescents. Course content builds upon the information presented in Part I related to the principles of health promotion, disease prevention, and assessment and management of common primary health care problems in children and adolescents. Using a family-centered and developmental perspective, related advanced pathophysiology, research, psychosocial factors, and ethical considerations are explored. Prerequisite: 305D/E, 308, 311, 312A; Pre/corequisite: 307E. [3] Spring BACK


312C. Advanced Practice Nursing in Pediatric Acute Care-Part I. In this first part of the pediatric acute care didactic course sequence, information is presented that is necessary for the practice and management of acutely ill, critically ill, and chronically ill children and adolescents. Course content relates to the principles of assessment and management of common health care problems in children and adolescents. A portion of the course includes information necessary for PNPs to care for pediatric clients with special needs and their families. Using a family-centered and developmental perspective, related advanced pathophysiology, research, psychosocial factors, and ethical considerations are explored. Prerequisite: 305D, 305G, 308, 312A; corequisite: 307E, 314C. [3] Spring BACK


312D. Advanced Practice Nursing in Pediatric Acute Care-Part II. In this second part of the pediatric acute care didactic course sequence, information is presented that is necessary for the practice of illness management of children and adolescents. Course content builds upon the information presented in Part I related to the principles of assessment and management of common health care problems in acutely ill, critically ill, and chronically ill children and adolescents. A portion of the course includes information necessary for PNPs to care for pediatric clients with special needs and their families. Using a family-centered and developmental perspective, related advanced pathophysiology, research, psychosocial factors, and ethical considerations are explored. Prerequisite: 305D, 305G, 308, 312A/C. [3] Summer BACK


313. Current Issues in the Delivery of Advanced Pediatric Care. The focus of this course is on the pediatric nurse practitioner role in developing, implementing, and evaluating comprehensive care with pediatric clients. Applications of effective strategies with selected families and populations are emphasized. The course provides an opportunity for synthesis of knowledge and skills, including management and communication strategies, health policies and trends, appropriate theories, and ethical principles. Pre/corequisite: None. [3] Summer BACK


314A. Practicum in Primary Health Care of Children. This course is a precepted clinical practicum focusing on pediatric health care in the primary care setting with an emphasis on health promotion, management of common health problems, and client education. A developmental approach is used in assessing the child and adolescent and formulating the treatment plan. Nursing strategies to educate and assist children and families in adaptation to special health needs will be discussed and implemented. Learners also participate in clinical conferences where various pathophysiological and psychological processes encountered with the child and his/her family will be discussed. The role of the nurse practitioner as a primary health care provider in a variety of pediatric settings is examined. Learners explore relevant resources/research related to pediatric health care and apply findings to the care of clients. Prerequisite: 305D/E, 308, 311, 312A; Pre/corequisite: 307E, 312B. [4] Spring BACK


314B. Advanced Pediatric Primary Care Preceptorship. The focus of this clinical practicum is on implementation of the pediatric nurse practitioner role in delivering primary care to pediatric clients. The preceptorship provides a broad practice experience which allows for synthesis of knowledge and skills acquired in prerequisite and corequisite coursework. Emphasis is on providing comprehensive care to pediatric clients and families across a variety of practice settings in collaboration with other health professionals. At least 240 of the total clinical hours will be in primary care settings. Clinical seminars will focus on professional role issues for pediatric nurse practitioners and case presentations. Prerequisite: 305D/E, 307E, 308, 311, 312A/B, 314A. [5] Summer BACK


314C. Practicum in Acute Health Care of Children. This course is a precepted clinical practicum focusing on child health care with two foci: 1) an emphasis on management of pediatric acute conditions, and client education; and 2) an emphasis on the management of special health needs in children. A developmental approach is used in assessing the child and formulating the treatment plan. Learners will participate in a precepted clinical rotation in a pediatric health care setting that provides the opportunity for health assessment of the child and the formulation of a comprehensive plan of care. Clinical experiences will also provide students with the opportunity for health assessment and formulation of a comprehensive plan of care for children with special health needs. Nursing strategies to educate and assist children and families in adaptation to special health needs will be discussed and implemented. Learners will also participate in clinical conferences where various pathophysiological and psychological processes encountered with the child and his/her family will be discussed. The role of the nurse practitioner as an acute health care provider in a variety of acute pediatric settings will be examined. Learners will explore relevant resources/research related to child health care and apply findings to the care of clients. Prerequisite: 305D/E, 307E, 311, 312A/C, 314A. [4] Spring BACK


314D. Advanced Pediatric Acute Care Preceptorship. This course is a continuation of the precepted clinical practicum focusing on child health care with two foci: 1) an emphasis on management of pediatric acute conditions, and client education; and 2) an emphasis on the management of special health needs in children. A developmental approach is used in assessing the child and formulating the treatment plan. Learners will participate in a precepted clinical rotation in a pediatric health care setting which provides the opportunity for health assessment of the child and the formulation of a comprehensive plan of care. Clinical experiences will also provide students with the opportunity for health assessment and formulation of a comprehensive plan of care for children with special health needs. Nursing strategies to educate and assist children and families in adaptation to special health needs will be discussed and implemented. Learners will also participate in clinical conferences where various pathophysiological and psychological processes encountered with the child and his/her family will be discussed. The role of the nurse practitioner as an acute health care provider in a variety of acute pediatric settings will be examined. Learners will explore relevant resources/research related to child health care and apply findings to the care of clients. Prerequisite: 305D, 305G, 307E, 311, 312A, 312C, 314A. [5] Summer BACK


315. Essential Components of Neo Intensive Care Nursing and Intro to Adv Practice Neonatal Nursing Skills. This course provides students with an introduction to the advanced practice skills commonly performed by neonatal nurse practitioners. A step-by-step practical approach is taken to describe the procedures. Students demonstrate an understanding of essential intensive care nursery concepts, skill, and equipment necessary for completing direct bedside assessment and care of neonates in a safe manner. The theoretical basis, indications and complications for these skills are emphasized. Students have the opportunity to practice the skills presented in the course under the supervision of experienced Advanced Practice Neonatal Nurses. NRP and PALS resuscitation techniques will be evaluated as a part of this course. The differentiation between normal and abnormal lab values is also emphasized. Prerequisite: 305C, 306C, 316, corequisite: 307D, 317A/B. [3] Spring BACK


316. Neonatal Nursing Birth Through 2 Years of Age. This course focuses on the health status and care of the neonates and infants through 2 years of age. Emphasis is placed on theories of attachment, growth and development through 2 years of age. This course is designed to help students in the use of critical thinking to foster health promotion, primary prevention of illness and management of common older infant medical conditions. Physical, social, cognitive and emotional growth will be address as well as issues associated with the development of sleep/wake cycles, infant behavior, newborn laboratory screening, feeding, infant and childhood immunizations, safety, and common parental concerns. Normal variations and minor disruptions in aspects of newborn and infant health are emphasized.Knowledge synthesized from this course provides an essential working foundation for future neonatal/infant course work. Clinical practice in the role of the NNP related to infant outcomes and ethical dilemmas are discussed. Corequisite: 306C. [3] Fall BACK


317A. Neonatal Pathophysiology and Management I. This is the first of two sequential courses in which students examine the pathophysiology and management of ill neonates/infants and their families. Theory and research form the basis for discussions of clinical assessment and restorative care. This course emphasizes the role of the advanced practice nurse in the care of high-risk neonates/infants. Perinatal risk factors associated with variations in neonatal health and functioning are also examined. Issues, trends and legal issues of the NNP role are addressed. Corequisite: 305C, 306C, 316. [3] Fall BACK


317B. Neonatal Pathophysiology and Management II. This is the second of two sequential courses in which students examine the pathophysiology and management of ill neonates/infants and their families. Theory and research form the basis for discussions of clinical assessment and restorative care. This course continues to emphasize the role of the advanced practice nurse in the care of high-risk neonates/infants. Integration of previous knowledge of embryology, physiology, pathophysiology, interpretation of lab data, radiologic findings and collaboration with other health professionals are emphasized. Prerequisite: 305C, 306C, 316, 317A; Corequisite: 307D, 315. [3] Spring BACK


318. Neonatal Practicum. Clinical practicum and seminars provide opportunities for developing advanced skills in the nursing care of critically ill and recovering neonatal clients. Experiences in facilitating and evaluating continuity of care across several settings are a major thrust. Students work collaboratively with NNPs on unit-based research projects as part of the practicum. Advanced practice nursing roles and expert skills are critically examined in clinical and individual conferences. RN licensure is required prior to beginning clinical hours. This course builds on the knowledge obtained during the Fall and early part of the Spring semesters. Students are expected to attend deliveries and provide complete care to neonates/infants in a Level II nursery. Experiences will also occur in the newborn follow-up clinic or pediatrician office to care for older infants through 2 years of age. Prerequisite: 305C, 306C, 315, 316, 317A/B; successful completion of Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) and Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) is required prior to clinical. [3] Spring BACK


319. Neonatal Preceptorship. Students synthesize theory, knowledge, and skills from previous courses within the neonatal nurse practitioner scope of practice. Clinical preceptorships provide students with opportunities to further develop expertise relevant to the assessment and management of groups of neonates and infants through 2 years of age. Prerequisite: 305C, 306C, 315, 316, 317A/B, 318; all core courses. [6] Summer BACK


326. Women's Health Issues. In this course, students examine major historical, political and cultural influences on the health and health care of women in the United States. Students develop a woman-centered holistic approach to care, which is the central concept in their women's health nursing practice. Pre/corequisite: None. [1] Summer BACK


327A. Women's Health for Advanced Practice Nursing I. Consistent with the emerging definitions of women's health and women's health practice, this course examines a full range of health issues unique to women. Women's health specialization includes prevention, the societal and political determinants of health, patient education, and reconceptualization of women's relationships with health care providers. Health assessment and maintenance as well as disease identification and treatment will be presented on a wellness to illness continuum. Students utilize current research in women's health and identify potential research opportunities. Pre/corequisite: 305A. [3] Fall BACK


327B. Women's Health for Advanced Practice Nursing II. Building on prior knowledge of women's health, students begin to critically examine and evaluate concepts and research related to pregnancy and childbearing. This course focuses on advanced practice nursing knowledge necessary for the comprehensive assessment and case management of the childbearing family. Concepts include prevention, the societal and political determinants of health, patient education and reconceptualization of women's relationships with health care providers. Pre/corequisite: 308, 327A. [3] Spring BACK


328. Practicum in Women's Health. In this practicum, students apply advanced knowledge of normal physiology, pathophysiology, and psychosocial concepts to nursing care of women across the lifespan. This practicum includes specific components of advanced nursing practice from self-directed clinical experience with expert professional nurse/physician preceptors in a variety of settings. Pre/corequisite: 305A, 305B, 307, 327A, 327B. [3] Spring and Summer BACK


329. Preceptorship in Women's Health. In the final preceptorship, students are given the opportunity to integrate knowledge and refine advanced practice skills by functioning in the women's health nurse practitioner role. The focus is on the synthesis of theory, knowledge, and skills from previous courses for the women's health nurse practitioner scope of practice. Pre/corequisite: 328, all core courses. [6] Summer BACK


330. Antepartal Care for Nurse-Midwifery. This course provides the theoretical basis of individualized family-centered management of pregnancy for women of diverse cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. Pregnancy is viewed as a normal physiologic and developmental process that affects and is affected by a variety of factors, including psychosocial, epidemiologic, legal and ethical issues. Strategies are presented for health promotion and disease prevention, including preconception and prenatal screening, health education, empowerment of women, and collaboration with other health care providers. Selected complications of pregnancy are addressed, and appropriate applications of technology, pharmacologic, non-pharmacologic, and common complementary and alternative therapies are considered. A variety of evidence supporting management decisions is critically examined, including published research, standards of care, and risk management principles. The American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) Philosophy, Code of Ethics, ACNM Core Competencies for Basic Midwifery Practice (including Hallmarks of Midwifery and Midwifery Management Process), and the Standards for Midwifery Practice provide the framework of the course. Pre/corequisite: 306B, 327A. [3] Spring BACK


331. Nurse-Midwifery Practicum I. Students apply advanced knowledge of normal physiology, pathophysiology and psychosocial concepts to nurse-midwifery care of women from permenarche through post-menopause. Students apply specific components of the American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) Philosophy, Core Competencies for Basic Midwifery Practice (including the Hallmarks of Midwifery and Midwifery Management Process), Standards for the Practice of Midwifery, and the Code of Ethics to women from peri-menarche through post-menopause including primary care, preconception, antepartal, and interconceptional periods. Clinical experience is under the supervision of nurse-midwifery, nurse practitioner, or physician preceptors in a variety of settings. Students have the opportunity to identify and discuss risk management and ethical issues inherent in clinical practice. Pre/corequisite: 305A/B, 307, 327A; corequisite: 330. [2] Spring BACK


333. Evolution of Midwifery in America. This course surveys the historical and social literature of midwifery nursing and medicine in the context of the care of women and infants. Development of midwifery and the professional organization are analyzed and interpreted. Development of the midwife and nurse-midwife are examined in relation to societal, economic, and political issues involved in health care systems from the 18th century to present. Dynamics that affect the medical and midwifery models of care will be discussed to provide critical understanding of women's health care in America. Prerequisite: none. [2] Fall BACK


334. Skills for Nurse-Midwifery. This course provides nurse-midwifery students with clinical experiences needed to develop skills necessary during uncomplicated birth and specific complicated or emergency situations in the intrapartum and postpartum periods. Prerequisite: 330. [1] Summer BACK


335. Practicum in Intrapartum/Postpartum/Neonatal Nurse-Midwifery Care. Students will integrate theory and research findings into the management of the care of women during the intrapartum period, and the care of the mother/baby dyad in the post-partum period. Students have the opportunity to apply components of the American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) Core Competencies for Basic Midwifery Practice (including the Hallmarks of Midwifery and Midwifery Management Process), Standards for the Practice of Midwifery, and the Code of Ethics in the management of labor, birth, and the puerperium. Newborn assessment, methods of screening for abnormalities, supporting healthy adaptation to extrauterine life, and facilitating the healthy parental-newborn family relationships are applied. Clinical objectives are achieved in a variety of settings under the preceptorship of experienced certified nurse-midwives, advanced practice nurses, and physicians. Prerequisite: 305A, 305B, 306B, 307. Pre/Corequisite: 336, 338. [4] Summer BACK


336. Intrapartum Care for Nurse-Midwifery. This course examines the theoretical basis of intrapartum nurse-midwifery management. Multidisciplinary theories, concepts, and research are synthesized to develop safe management plans that are culturally and ethically appropriate and applicable to the physical, emotional, and educational needs of the childbearing woman and her family. Nurse-midwifery management recognizes pregnancy and birth as a normal physiologic and developmental process. Management includes non-intervention in the absence of complications as well as selected intrapartum complications and emergencies. A variety of evidence supporting management decisions is critically examined, including published research, standards of care, and risk management principles. The American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) Philosophy, Code of Ethics, ACNM Core Competencies for Basic Midwifery Practice (including Hallmarks of Midwifery and Midwifery Management Process), and the Standards for Midwifery Practice provide the framework of the course. Prerequisite: 305A, 305B, 306B, 307, 327A, 330, 331. [3] Summer BACK


338. Nurse-Midwifery Care of the Mother-Baby Dyad. This course examines theory and research related to nurse-midwifery management of the maternal/newborn dyad during the post-partum period, and strategies for facilitating healthy physiological adaptation and parental-family-newborn relationships. Methods of screening for and collaborative management of common abnormalities are discussed. Management includes non-intervention in the absence of complications as well as selected postpartum complications and emergencies. The American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) Core Competencies for Basic Midwifery Practice (including Hallmarks of Midwifery and Midwifery Management Process), Standards of Midwifery Practice and Code of Ethics provide the framework for the course. Prerequisite: 305A, 306B, 307, 331. Corequisite: 327A, 330, 335, 336. [2] Summer BACK


339. Advanced Clinical Integration Experience for Nurse-Midwifery. The final nurse-midwifery practicum allows the student to practice full scope nurse-midwifery under the supervision of experienced Certified Nurse-Midwife preceptors, managing women's health care from perimenarche through the postmenopausal periods and newborn health care from birth through the first month of life. Full scope nurse-midwifery care includes the areas of gynecology, family planning, preconception, antepartum, intrapartum, postpartum, newborn, breast-feeding support, common health problems in the pregnant and non-pregnant woman, and the peri and post menopausal periods. Students immerse themselves in the clinical practice to which they are assigned and reside in the community in which it is located, providing for continuity of care. Practice is in collaboration with the client and other health care providers, consulting and referring according to the nurse-midwifery management process. Academic faculty are closely involved with the selection of appropriate clinical sites and ongoing advisement and evaluation of the student during the practicum. A written comprehensive exam is taken after the practicum is completed. By the end of the course, the graduate is prepared to assume the role of the beginning professional nurse-midwife and to sit for the American Midwifery Certification Board (AMCB) certification examination. The AMCB Philosophy, Code of Ethics, and Core Competencies for Basic Midwifery Practice (including Hallmarks of Midwifery and Midwifery Management Process), and the Standards for Midwifery Practice provide the framework of the course. Prerequisite: 327A, 330, 331, 334, 335, 336, 337, 338. [5] Fall BACK


340A. Pathophysiology and Collaborative Management in Acute Care for the Adult-Gerontology ACNP I. This course explores, at an advanced level, pathophysiology, assessment, diagnosis, and collaborative management of adults and older adults with selected episodic/chronic health problems in acute/critical care, including pulmonary and cardiovascular disorders. Each student demonstrates the ability to analyze, integrate, and synthesize pathophysiologic concepts and current research findings for collaborative management of adult health problems. Pre/corequisite: 305B/F, 306A. [3] Fall BACK


340B. Pathophysiology and Collaborative Management in Acute Care for the Adult-Gerontology ACNP II. This course explores, at an advanced level, the pathophysiology, assessment, diagnosis, and collaborative management of adults and older adults with selected episodic/chronic health problems in acute/critical care, including oncology and renal and fluid and electrolyte disorders. Each student demonstrates his/her ability to analyze, integrate, and synthesize pathophysiologic concepts for collaborative management of adult health problems. The course goals are met through didactic content and case study analyses. Pre/corequisite: 399A. Prerequisite: 306A, 307C, 340A. [3] Spring BACK


340C. Pathophysiology and Collaborative Management in Acute Care for the Adult-Gerontology ACNP III. This course is third in a sequence of courses that explores, at an advanced level, the pathophysiology, assessment, diagnosis, and collaborative management of adults and older adults with selected episodic/chronic health problems in acute/critical care, including hematologic, hepatic, endocrine, and gastrointestinal disorders as well as psychosocial needs. Each student demonstrates his or her ability to analyze, integrate, and synthesize pathophysiologic concepts for collaborative management of adult health problems. The course goals are met through didactic content and case study analyses. Prerequisite: 340A, 340B. [3] Summer BACK


341. Theoretical Foundation of Oncology Nursing. This course consists of didactic content related to the care of adult patients with neoplastic disorders. The course focuses on primary and secondary prevention, pathophysiologic processes underlying carcinogenesis, treatment modalities, symptom management, and home care for terminal patients. This course enables the student to explore the roles of an Advanced Practice Nurse caring for patients who have cancer or are at high risk for developing cancer. Pre/corequisite: None. [3] Spring BACK


342A. Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Practicum. This course is designed to provide clinical experience in development and application of the roles of the acute care nurse practitioner. The students apply and evaluate nursing theory and pathophysiologic and psychosocial concepts in planning and delivery of care in clinical settings. The student practices in clinical settings for a total of 280 hours. Clinical conferences are held weekly and focus on pathophysiology, diagnoses, and therapeutic management related to episodic/chronic problems in acute/critical care in the adult population. Prerequisite: 305B/F, 306A, 307C, 340A; corequisite: 340B. [4] Spring BACK


342B. Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Practicum. This course is designed to provide clinical experience in development and application of the roles of the acute care adult nurse practitioner. The clinical setting will be used for application and evaluation of nursing theory and pathophysiologic and psychosocial concepts in planning and developing care for culturally diverse adults and older adults in the clinical setting. The student will practice in clinical settings for a total of 140 hours. Clinical conferences will be held weekly and will focus on pathophysiology, diagnoses, and therapeutic management related to episodic/chronic problems in acute/critical care in the adult population. Pre/corequisite: 305A or F, 305B, 306A, 307C, 340A. [2] Spring BACK


342C. Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Practicum in Intensive Care. This course is designed to provide clinical experience in development and application of the roles of the acute care adult nurse practitioner with an intensivist focus. The clinical setting will be used for application and evaluation of pathophysiologic and psychosocial concepts in planning and developing care in the clinical setting. Student will be assigned to multidisciplinary critical care teams and will rotate through these teams during the course. The student will practice in clinical settings for a total of 210 hours. Clinical conferences will be held weekly and will focus on pathophysiology, diagnoses, and therapeutic management related to episodic/chronic problems in critical care in the adult population. Prerequisites: 305B, 305F, 306A, 307C, 340A; Pre/corequisite: 340B, 396E. [3] Spring BACK


343. Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Preceptorship. This course is the final clinical preceptorship, and it is designed to provide clinical experience in and application and integration of the roles of the acute care nurse practitioner. The clinical setting will be used for application, synthesis, and evaluation of nursing theory and pathophysiologic and psychosocial concepts. The students practice in clinical settings for a total of 280 hours, and will focus on working with complex adult and older adult patients. Clinical conference will be held every week and will focus on pathophysiology, diagnoses, and therapeutic management related to episodic/chronic problems in acute/critical care in the adult population. Prerequisite: 305B, 305F, 306A, 307C, 340A, 340B, 342A, RN licensure; Pre/corequisite: 340C. [4] Summer BACK


343B. Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Preceptorship. This course is the final acute care nurse practitioner clinical preceptorship and is designed to provide clinical experience, application, and integration of the roles of the acute care nurse practitioner for students in the dual FNP/ACNP-Emergency Care program. The clinical setting will be used for application, synthesis, and evaluation of nursing theory and pathophysiologic and psychosocial concepts in planning and developing care for culturally diverse adults and older adults. The student will practice in clinical settings for a total of 280 hours and will focus on working with complex patients. Clinical conference will be held every week and will focus on pathophysiology, diagnoses, and therapeutic management related to episodic/chronic problems in adult acute/critical care. Pre/corequisite: 305B, 305F, 306A, 340A, 340B, 340C, 342B, all core courses. [4] Summer BACK


343C. Advanced Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Intensivist Practicum. This course is designed to provide clinical experience in and application and integration of the roles of the acute care nurse practitioner as an intensivist. The clinical setting will be used for application, synthesis, and evaluation of nursing theory and pathophysiologic and psychosocial concepts. The student will practice in clinical settings for a total of 210 hours and will focus on working with patients in a variety of intensive care units. Clinical conference will be held every week and will focus on pathophysiology, diagnoses, and therapeutic management related to critical care and acute care problems for the adult population in an intensive care setting or step down unit. Prerequisite: 305B, 305F, 306A, 307C, 340A, 340B, 342C, 396D. Pre/Corequisite: 340C. [3] Summer BACK


343D. Advanced Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Intensivist Preceptorship. This is the final clinical preceptorship and is designed to provide clinical experience in and application and integration of the roles of the acute care nurse practitioner as an intensivist. The clinical setting will be used for application, synthesis, and evaluation of nursing theory and pathophysiologic and psychosocial concepts. The student will practice in clinical settings for a total of 140 hours and will focus on working with patients in a variety of intensive care units. Clinical conference will be held every week and will focus on pathophysiology, diagnoses, and therapeutic management related to critical care and acute care problems for the adult population in an intensive care setting or step down unit. Prerequisite: 305B, 305F, 306A, 307C, 340A, 340B, 342C, 396D. Pre/Corequisite: 340C, 343C. [2] Summer BACK


345. Introduction to Transplantation. This elective course consists of didactic content related to the care of adults undergoing transplantation with emphasis on immunology, immunosuppression, and criteria for transplantation, as well as complications related to transplantation and immunosuppression. An overview of transplantation of the heart, lung, liver, kidney, pancreas, and bone marrow is presented. Ethical, psychosocial, and donor selection/management issues are discussed. [2] Spring BACK


347. Advanced Concepts in Cardiovascular Nursing. This course is designed to provide a conceptual basis for the diagnosis and treatment of human response to actual and/or potential cardiovascular health problems. The concomitant influence of physical, psychological, social, cultural and environmental variables will also be explored. Emphasis is placed on acute and/or critically ill patients with alterations in cardiovascular health states, as well as on the selection and application of concepts and theories relevant to advanced cardiovascular nursing. NURS 347 is an elective support course for students within the Adult-Gerontologic Acute Care Nurse Practitioner (AG-ACNP) Program who wish to develop a foundation for advanced practice in the management of cardiovascular disease. Learning experiences focus on management of cardiovascular disease in acute and critically ill patient populations. Pre/corequisite: 305B, 305D, 306A, 307C, 340A and 340B, or with permissions of the course coordinator. Spring [2] Widmar. Spring BACK


348. Concepts of Diagnostics and Care for the Hospitalist Acute Care Nurse Practitioner. This course builds on the foundational knowledge received in N305F, N306A, N307C and the N340 series. The course introduces basic concepts of hospital practice used by acute care nurse practitioners. The hospitalist manages care from the time of patient hospital admission to discharge. A variety of hospital topics will be covered in this course to include lab and diagnostic testing during all phases of the hospitalization process, consultation practice, working with ancillary services, including physical occupation and speech therapists and case management issues. Students will gain basic knowledge of procedures but will not be performing procedural care during this course. Pre/Corequisite: 305B, 305F, 306A, 307C and 340A; concurrent enrollment in N340B and N342. [2] Spring BACK


350. Models and Theories of Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing. This course introduces a variety of conceptual models and theories related to the practice of psychotherapy. Models of personality development and individual functioning provide a theoretical basis for understanding the development of psychopathology and the selection of appropriate therapeutic strategies. Students apply selected theories to case study material and evaluate the utility of theory-based research findings to specific client populations. [2] Fall BACK


351. Theoretical Foundations and Practicum for Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing Across the Lifespan. This course provides the theoretical content and clinical practice for assessing, diagnosing, and intervening in dysfunctional coping patterns and psychiatric disorders of individuals across the life span. The DSM-IV-TR will be discussed across the life span. Emphasis will be placed on the assessment, diagnosis and evidence-based treatment of mental health disorders. Laboratory time concentrates on role play and simulation of initial diagnostic interviews and formulation of differential diagnoses and initial treatment plans. Clinical practicum provides students the opportunity to integrate theory and practice in supervised clinical experiences. Analysis of process dynamics and nursing interventions occurs during supervision. Pre/corequisite: 305A, 305B, 350. [3] Fall BACK


352. Neuroscience for Mental Health Practitioners. This course presents the theoretical basis for anatomical, biological, and psychological aspects of advanced practice in psychiatric-mental health nursing. Concepts from neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and neuropathophysiology, neuropsychiatry, psychiatry, psychology, and social sciences are examined for their applications to advanced practice. Pre/corequisite: 353. [2] Spring BACK


353. Psychopharmacology. This course presents advanced concepts in neuroscience, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and the clinical management of targeted psychiatric symptoms, related to the psychopharmacologic treatment of various psychiatric disorders. The course reflects current scientific knowledge of psychopharmacology and its application to clinical problems seen in a variety of settings. This course builds on diagnostic and neuroscience content from N352 to provide the advanced practitioner with knowledge related to clinical management of psychotropic medications. Pre/corequisite: 352 or permission of faculty. [2] Spring BACK


354. Theoretical Foundations of Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing with Groups and Families. This course introduces a variety of conceptual models and theories related to the practice of group and family psychotherapy. Yalom's theoretical model provides the foundation for understanding group psychotherapy and its application and modification to selected client populations. A survey of current family therapy models and their theoretical bases provides a context for role-play and application to selected family case studies. Emphasis is placed on the integration of relevant theories into practice and the evaluation of theory-based research findings of therapeutic strategies for groups and families with mental health needs. This course builds on mental health assessment knowledge and models and theories of psychiatric nursing as well as provides guidance to students currently enrolled in clinical settings where they will be providing group and family therapy. Pre/corequisite: 350, 356, or permission of instructor. [2] Spring BACK


355. Child and Adolescent Psychopathology. This course builds on prerequisite knowledge of theoretical foundations of advanced nursing practice, mental health assessment, group and family therapy, models and theories of psychiatric nursing, neurobiology, psychopharmacology, research methods, pathophysiology, and clinical practicum with psychiatric patients. This two-credit course for post-master's Adult PMHNP or Adult PMHCNS students reviews the major childhood disorders; looking at epidemiology, health and mental health promotion and prevention, risk factors, taxonomy, cultural factors, assessment issues specific to children and adolescents, use of rating scales, as well as evidence-based child and adolescent specific treatments. Individual therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, family-based interventions, psychopharmacological interventions, trauma-based interventions and combinations of these treatments will all be presented. Pre/corequisite: Admission to the PMHNP specialty level as a post-master's student who holds current ANCC certification as an Adult Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) or Adult Psychiatric Mental Health Clinical Nurse Specialist (PMHCNS), has a master's degree or a post-master's certificate in psychiatric mental health nursing from an NLNAC or CCNE accredited program documented by official transcripts, holds a nursing license in an eligible state, and receives approval from the PMHNP Program Director to be eligible to take this course. [2] Fall BACK


356. Practicum in Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing with Individuals, Groups, and Families. This course builds on the first advanced practicum course by expanding the student's ability to identify and apply concepts, theories, and principles to complex groups. In addition, the student gains skill in implementing planned interventions and analyzing process dynamics with individuals, families, and groups so that patterns in self and others are identified accurately and with regularity. Caseload management skills are further developed. A focused needs assessment at clinical site will form the basis for implementation and evaluation of summer clinical project to improve some aspect of patient care or agency services. Pre/corequisite: 351, 354. [4] Spring BACK


357. Population-based Mental Health Care Across the Lifespan. This course focuses on systems issues affecting clients across the lifespan who require special attention from the advanced practice psychiatric nursing role. Emphasis is placed on effective management of current practice issues without compromising the special needs of these populations. These issues deal with the areas of effective evidence-based treatments, interface with families, developmental task resolution, legal/ethical decision-making, socialization, placements, co-morbidities in care and finances. This content is then conceptualized and operationalized relative to the advanced practice psychiatric nursing role and its interface with both the interdisciplinary psychiatric team of care and other health care professionals involved in the holistic treatment of the patient. Pre/corequisite: Admission to the PMHNP specialty level. Successful completion of 351, 356 clinical coursework. [2] Summer BACK


358A. Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Preceptorship. This clinical course provides a synthesis experience during which students implement the role of the psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioner. The focus is on assessment and intervention with persons with mental illness and persons/populations at risk for mental illness, and primary prevention in mental health. Both direct (assessment and intervention) and indirect (consultation, case management, supervision) roles will be implemented. Collaboration with other health care providers is emphasized. Pre/corequisite: 356, all core courses. [4] Summer BACK


358B. Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Preceptorship with Adult and Geriatric Focus. This clinical course builds on prerequisite knowledge of theoretical foundations of advanced practice mental health nursing and provides a synthesis experience during which the student implements the role of the psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioner applying current evidence-based practice focusing on adult and geriatric clients and their families. Additional prerequisite knowledge includes mental health assessment, group and family therapy, models and theories of psychiatric nursing, neurobiology, psychopharmacology, research methods, pathophysiology, and previous psychiatric-mental health nursing experience. The clinical emphasis is on assessment, diagnosis, pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions with adults and geriatric clients with mental illness and for persons/populations at risk for mental illness, as well as primary prevention in mental health. Both direct (assessment and intervention) and indirect (consultation, case management, supervision) roles will be implemented. This preceptorship is designed for ANCC Certified Adult Psychiatric-Mental Health Clinical Nurse Specialists and Child/Adolescent Psychiatric-Mental Health Clinical Nurse Specialists seeking post-master's certificate as a Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner prepared across the lifespan. Pre/corequisite: Admission to the PMHNP specialty level as a post-master's student who holds one or both of the following current ANCC certification(s): Clinical Nurse Specialist in Adult Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing (Adult PMH-CNS) or Clinical Nurse Specialist in Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing (Child/Adolescent PMH-CNS); has a master's degree or post-master's certificate in psychiatric mental health nursing from an NLNAC or CCNE accredited program documented by official transcripts, holds a nursing license in an eligible state, and receives approval from the PMHNP Program Director to be eligible to take this course; 305A/B, 307, 308, 352, and 353; Gap analysis of graduate transcripts for completion of equivalent content and clinical for 350, 351, 354, 356, 357, 395, 399A. [3] Spring and Summer BACK


358C. Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Preceptorship with Child and Adolescent Focus. This clinical course builds on prerequisite knowledge of theoretical foundations of advanced practice mental health nursing and provides a synthesis experience during which the student implements the role of the psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioner applying current evidence-based practice focusing on children and adolescent clients and their families. Additional prerequisite knowledge includes mental health assessment, group and family therapy, models and theories of psychiatric nursing, neurobiology, psychopharmacology, research methods, pathophysiology, and previous psychiatric-mental health nursing experience. The clinical emphasis is on assessment, diagnosis, pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions with children and adolescents with behavioral, developmental, and mental health disorders or at risk for mental illness within the context of their families and communities. Both direct (assessment and intervention) and indirect (consultation, case management, supervision) roles will be implemented. This preceptorship is designed for ANCC Certified Adult PMH-CNS, Child-Adolescent PMH-CNSs, or Adult PMHNPs seeking post-master's certificate as Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner prepared across the lifespan. Pre/corequisite: Admission to the PMHNP specialty level as a post-master's student who holds one or more of the following current ANCC certification(s): Clinical Nurse Specialist in Adult Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing (Adult PMH-CNS), Clinical Nurse Specialist in Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing (Child/Adolescent PMH-CNS), or Adult Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (Adult PMHNP); has a master's degree or post-master's certificate in psychiatric mental health nursing from an NLNAC or CCNE accredited program documented by official transcripts, holds a nursing license in an eligible state, and receives approval from the PMHNP Program Director to be eligible to take this course. 305A/B, 307, 308 and Gap Analysis of graduate transcripts for completion of equivalent content and clinical for 350, 351, 352, 353, 354, 356, 357, 395, 399A/B. [3] Spring and Summer BACK


360A. Practicum in Primary Health Care of the Family. This course is a clinical practicum focusing on child, adolescent and adult health care with an emphasis on health promotion, management of common health problems, and client education. A developmental approach across the lifespan is used in assessing the client and family in formulating the treatment plan. Students participate in a clinical rotation in a primary care setting which provides the opportunity for health assessment of clients of all ages and the formulation of a comprehensive plan of care. Clinical conferences highlight various pathophysiological and psychological processes encountered with clients and their families. The role of the nurse practitioner as a primary health care provider in a variety of primary health care settings will be examined. Relevant resources/research related to health is explored with the application of findings to the care of clients. Prerequisite: 305A/B; Corequisite: 307, 308, 309A/B/C. [variable credit - 4 for FNP; 2 for NMW/FNP] Spring BACK


360B. Practicum in Primary Health Care of the Family. This course is a clinical practicum focusing on child, adolescent and adult health care with an emphasis on health promotion, management of common health problems, and client education. A developmental approach across the lifespan is used in assessing the client and family in formulating the treatment plan. Students participate in a clinical rotation in a primary care setting which provides the opportunity for heal assessment of clients of all ages and the formulation of a comprehensive plan of care. Clinical conferences highlight various pathophysiological and psychological processes encountered with clients and their families. The role of the nurse practitioner as a primary health care provider in a variety of primary health care settings will be examined. Relevant resources/research related to health is explored with the application of findings to the care of clients. Prerequisite: 305A, 305B, 307, 308, 309A, 309B, 309C, 309D, 360A. [1] Summer BACK


360C. Clinical Decision Making for the Family Nurse Practitioner. This clinical course builds on knowledge and skills developed in previous didactic courses and implemented in the first practicum. Emphasis is on utilization of evidence-based practice and the integration of technology into primary care. This course focuses on management of the patient with complex acute or chronic illness. The purpose of the course is to enable the student to enter practice with the ability to independently manage patients across the lifespan. Prerequisite:305A, 305B, 307, 308, 309A, 309B, 309C, 309D, 309E, 360A, 361A. Corequisite: 360B, 364. [1] Summer BACK


361A. The Context of Primary Care: Family Nurse Practitioner Domains and Core Competencies for Practice. This course is designed to provide Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) students with the knowledge of the context of primary care and related domains and core competencies of family nurse practitioner practice identified by the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF). Specific content of the course covers the hallmarks of primary care and the seven domains and focuses on operationalizing competencies into practice. Competencies needed to promote and protect health and prevent disease are emphasized. Pre-requisite knowledge: This course builds on previous course work involving the assessment, diagnosis, and management of common and chronic conditions seen in the primary care setting. [2] Spring BACK


362. Practicum in Primary Health Care of the Child and Adolescent. This course is a clinical practicum focusing on child and adolescent health care with an emphasis on health promotion, management of common health problems, and client education. A developmental approach across the lifespan is used in assessing the client and family in formulating the treatment plan. Students participate in a clinical rotation in a pediatric health care setting which provides the opportunity for health assessment of the child and adolescent and formulation of a comprehensive plan of care. Clinical conferences highlight various pathophysiological and psychological processes encountered with children and their families. The role of the nurse practitioner as a primary health care provider in a variety of pediatric settings is examined. Relevant resources and research related to the child and adolescent are explored with the application of findings to the care of clients. Pre-Corequisite: 305A/B, 307, 308, 309B/C. [2] Spring BACK


363A. Practicum in Primary Health Care of the Adult for Dual Specialty. This course is a clinical practicum focusing on adult health care with an emphasis on health promotion, management of common acute and chronic health problems, and client education. A developmental approach across the lifespan is used in assessing the client and family in formulating the treatment plan. Students participate in a clinical rotation in adult health care settings which provide the opportunity for health assessment of the adult and the development of a comprehensive plan of care. Clinical conferences highlight pathophysiological processes and psychological needs of the adults and their families. The role of the nurse practitioner as a primary health care provider in a variety of adult settings will be examined. Students explore relevant resources related to adult health care and apply findings to client situations. This course is for Adult-Gerontology/Family Nurse Practitioner: Emergency Care Focus students. Prerequisites: 305F, 305B. Corequisites: 307, 308, 309A [3] Fall and Summer BACK


363C. Practicum in Primary Health Care of the Adult. This course is a clinical practicum focusing on adult health care with emphasis on health promotion, management of common acute and chronic health problems, and client education. Students participate in a clinical rotation in adult health care settings which provide the opportunity for health assessment of the adult and the development of a comprehensive plan of care. Clinical conferences highlight pathophysiological processes and psychological needs of the adults and their families. The role of the nurse practitioner as a primary health care provider in a variety of adult settings will be examined. Students explore relevant resources related to adult health care and apply findings to client situations. This course is for NMW and NMW/FNP students. Prerequisite: 305A/B; Corequisite: 307, 308, 309A/D. [2] Spring BACK


364. Family Nurse Practitioner Preceptorship. In this clinical course, the student implements the role of the family nurse practitioner working with clients across the lifespan and their families in urban and/or rural primary care settings. The focus is on the integration of theory, knowledge, and skills from previous courses within the family nurse practitioner scope of practice. Pre/corequisite: 309A, 309B, 309C, 309D, 360A, 360B, all core courses. Additional prerequisite for NMW/FNP students: 363C. [4] Spring and Summer BACK


364A. Family Nurse Practitioner Preceptorship for AG-ACNP/FNP Dual Specialty. In this clinical course, the student implements the role of the family nurse practitioner working with clients across the lifespan and their families in urban and/or rural primary care settings. The focus is on the integration of theory, knowledge, and skills from previous courses within the family nurse practitioner scope of practice. For students who are pursuing dual preparation. 309A/B/C/D, 360A/B, 362, 373A, all core courses. [3] Spring and Summer BACK


365A. Adult Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Clinical I. This course is a clinical practicum focusing on adult health care with emphasis on health promotion, management of common acute and chronic health problems, and client education. Students participate in a clinical rotation in adult health care settings which provide the opportunity for health assessment of the adult and the development of a comprehensive plan of care. Clinical conferences highlight pathophysiological processes and psychological needs of the adults and their families. The role of the nurse practitioner as a primary health care provider in a variety of adult settings will be examined. Students explore relevant resources related to adult health care and apply findings to client situations. Pre/corequisite: 305A/B, 307, 308, 310A. [4] Fall and Spring BACK


365B. Adult Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Clinical II. In this clinical course, the student implements the role of the Adult Nurse Practitioner working with patient in the primary care setting. The focus is on the synthesis of theory, knowledge and skills from previous courses for the Adult Nurse Practitioner scope of practice. Pre/corequisite: 305A, 305B, 307, 308, 309C, 309E, 310A, 310B, 310C, 310D,365A, 395, 399A, 399B. [4] Spring and Summer BACK


368. Essential Procedures for the Primary Care Provider. This course builds on knowledge of advanced health assessment and primary care of the adult with a focus on procedures commonly performed in the adult practice setting. Using principles of universal precautions and infection control as a foundation, students will learn invasive procedures related to different body systems. Pre/corequisite: 305A. [2] Summer BACK


370. Independent Study, Non-Clinical. Content varies according to individual needs and interest. A contract is made between the student and the faculty sponsor, with copies for the student, the sponsor, the program director, and the student's record. [Variable credit 1-6] Fall, Spring, Summer BACK


371. Independent Study: Clinical. A program of independent study in a selected area of nursing practice under the direction of a faculty sponsor. A contract is made between the student and the faculty sponsor, with copies for the student, the sponsor, the program director, and the student's record. [Variable credit 1-6] Fall, Spring, Summer BACK


379. THESIS. THESIS BACK


380. Organizational Behavior. Integral to management practice is the acquisition of theoretical frameworks that explain organizational theories, management models and decision-making strategies related to health care systems and care delivery. In addition to providing a conceptual understanding of management practice, this course focuses on the development of interpersonal skills and effective leadership styles through role preparation, communication theories and the application of change strategies. Pre/corequisite: Specialty level status. [3] Fall BACK


381A. Introduction to Health Informatics. Health informatics is the management and transformation of health data into information and knowledge to improve aspects of health outcomes such as cost, quality, safety, and/or satisfaction. This survey course focuses on information systems in clinical settings and the use of information for health systems management. The recent emphasis on the National Health Information Infrastructure at the Federal level will be used to frame the topics. Examples include organizing information pertinent to individual patient care, analyzing data to determine clinical effectiveness, retrieving needed information or knowledge at the point of care, using data to improve management of health care enterprises, and assessing the health patterns of populations and aggregates. Pre/corequisite: Basic competency in using word processing, electronic mail, bibliographic or library retrieval systems, presentation graphics, spreadsheets, and databases. These skills are not taught in the course, but students will be required to apply them to carry out course assignments. [3] Fall BACK


381B. Technology Components of Informatics. This course explores the structure and function of networks and network based applications as they relate to their use within healthcare and healthcare education. Topics covered include basic concepts of infrastructure (IP addressing, routing and networks), the basic technology behind medical recording, BYOD (bring your own device) such as Cell Phones and Tablets, data collection and analysis tools, social networking including synchronous communication applications, and educational applications including asynchronous screen narration applications and Learning Management Systems. [2] Fall BACK


381C. Web Development for Health Care Applications. Students will begin this course by observing and critiquing websites in the health care area. They will identify features in websites that are effective and features they would want to avoid when developing websites. Then they will learn the skills necessary to develop sophisticated Web applications in the health care area. Sophisticated Web applications will be created in DHTML using Web editors such as Lectora. Basic HTML markup skills will be taught for the purpose of creating interactive Web applications through databases in the follow-up course. [3] Spring BACK


381D. Desktop Maintenance. The purpose of this course is to teach how to properly maintain your computer to minimize problems that may occur and handle simple issues and problems with your computer. The course will also cover how to properly install and uninstall hardware and software, how and when to rebuild your system, how to protect your system from worms and viruses, and the hows and whys of creating a home network connected to a broadband environment such as cable or DSL. [1] Fall BACK


381E. Database Design for Health Care Applications. The purpose of this course is to teach how to create online database applications in the health care field. While it is not the goal of this course to train the participants how to create full-fledged hospital management systems and electronic medical record systems, students will develop an understanding of the basic concepts underlying these systems by creating simple database applications on the Web. Database concepts including user interface design, table design, normalization, password protection, and data queries are basically the same regardless of the purpose of the application. Upon completion of this course, the students will have an appreciation and understanding of large scale database environments in their field and be able to communicate effectively with management system software developers using the appropriate terminology. Prerequisite: Knowledge of Web design and HTML. [2] Summer BACK


381F. Seminar in Nursing Informatics. The student will have the opportunity to explore the dimensions and responsibilities of the Informatics nurse specialist's role by applying legal/ethical concepts and critical thinking skills to selected case studies in a variety of settings. Students will use the Scope and Standards of Nursing Informatics Practice (ANA) and seminal articles from the literature to analyze case studies. [1] Spring BACK


381G. Consumer Health Care Informatics. This course addresses the consumer's use of electronic information systems and applications to improve their medical outcomes and their health care decisions. How informatics solutions impact the health care partnership of provider and patient is explored. Various technology and applications that empower consumers are reviewed. Studies that evaluate the effectiveness of health care informatics in patient outcomes are included. [2] Spring BACK


381W. Project Management. This course addresses the essential principles and tools of project management. Project integration, scope, time, cost, quality, human resource, communications, risk, and procurement management are discussed. [3] Summer BACK


382. Leadership. Theories and models of leadership are explored and students assess their personal leadership styles. Application of leadership theory in complex organization is explored. [3] Spring BACK


383A. Continuous Quality Improvement and Outcomes Measures. This course has two related foci: quality improvement models/methods and the measurement of client outcomes across a broad range of healthcare settings. Students learn the systematic methods of CQI, based on the work of Deming and others. These statistical and applied research methods are linked to the measurement of outcomes. The use of various outcome measurement instruments is explored. Prerequisite: Specialty level status and others by permission of course instructor. [3] Spring BACK


383B. Continuous Quality Improvement and Outcomes Measures. This course has two related foci: quality improvement models/methods and the measurement of client outcomes across a broad range of healthcare settings. Students learn the systematic methods of CQI, based of the work of Deming and others. These statistical and applied research methods are linked to the measurement of outcomes. The use of various outcome measurement instruments is explored. Prerequisite: Specialty level status and others by permission of the course instructor. [2] Fall BACK


384. Directed Reading. This is a directed reading course which introduces contemporary works from leaders who are influencing society and healthcare. [Variable 2-3] Spring BACK


385A. Health Care Financial Management. Students in this course apply accounting, economic principles, and financial management strategies to the management of health care resources in health care organizations. Students acquire a degree of proficiency at computerized spreadsheet utilization to enhance efficient financial analysis. [3] Fall BACK


386. Management Practicum I. The students apply models of CQI organizational behavior, outcome measurement, informatics, and financial management in a selected health care setting. This practicum provides students with an opportunity to work closely with a manager in a variety of health care settings. The students experience positive role modeling while contributing to the functioning of the health care agency. Students work on agency designated projects throughout the practicum. Prerequisite: 382, 385, all core courses. [3] Fall, Spring, Summer BACK


387. Management Practicum II. This practicum provides the student with an opportunity to work closely with a manager or administrator in a formal mentorship arrangement in a health care setting. The student has an opportunity to observe and practice management and leadership skills in a health care organization. The role of a leader is explored in the context of the changing health care environment. In addition, the student works on agency-designated projects and presents the process and results of a completed project. This practicum builds on skills and experiences attained in N386, Practicum I, of the HSM program. Students are assigned to a more senior leader in N387, and complexity of course deliverables is enhanced. Pre/corequisite: 386. [4] Fall, Spring, Summer BACK


388. Management Strategies for Health Care Systems. This course will focus on long-term strategic issues that will affect financing, organization and delivery of health care services. Market driven organizations/services are at the core of the course with emphasis on designing as well as operationalizing strategies at the executive and middle management levels as individuals and part of a team. [3] Fall and Summer BACK


389. Health Care Management of Populations. This course provides a framework for students to develop and apply both an ethical and a theoretical framework for population-based care management. Students develop a framework for measuring client satisfaction, quality of care, resource efficiency and explore principles of multidisciplinary collaboration. [3] Fall and Summer BACK


392A. Informatics of Clinical Practice. Informatics of clinical practice focuses on a structured approach to methodologies, techniques, and tools for information system development and implementation. The systems development life cycle approach incorporates the following phases: planning, analysis, design, implementation, and evaluation. The role of informatics nurse specialist is featured as well as the role of end users in this process. [3] Spring BACK


392B. Clinical Informatics Practicum I. Students apply concepts and theories in clinical informatics in selected health care settings. This practicum provides students with an opportunity to work closely with a preceptor to prepare a needs assessment for a nursing informatics project. In this clinical course, the student implements the role of the clinical informatics nurse in any health care setting. The focus is on the integration of theory, knowledge, and skills from previous courses within the various roles open to an informatics nurse specialist. [2] Spring BACK


392C. Informatics of Evidence-Based Practice. This course addresses informatics techniques to bring the best available evidence about nursing to the point of care to support the patient's health and decision making. The relationship between standardized languages, electronic documentation systems, and evidence-based nursing practice are explored. Use of the Internet to select and customize nursing interventions, point of care devices, and Web-based diagnostic decision support systems are examined. [2]. Summer BACK


392D. Clinical Informatics Practicum II. In this clinical course, the student implements the role of the informatics nurse specialist working in a health care environment. The focus of this course is the integration of theory, knowledge, and skills from previous courses from the perspective of project management. Pre/corequisites: 381A, 392A, 392C. [2] Summer BACK


395. APN Role Within the U.S. Healthcare Delivery System. This course provides students with an understanding of how the U.S. healthcare system works, including major components of both service delivery and financing of care. Students analyze and evaluate the healthcare delivery system, focusing on the role of the Advanced Practice Nurse within the system. The relationships between and among the various stakeholders , including consumers, providers, payers, regulatory agencies, and policy makers, are explored as well as their impact on healthcare delivery. The focus is on economic implications of health planning, organization of personnel and resources, design of payment systems, and cost effectiveness of healthcare delivery. [3] Fall and Summer BACK


396D. Advanced Critical Care Concepts for the ACNP Intensivist. This course assists students in developing the competence to evaluate, diagnose and treat patients with a variety of complex critical illnesses. Students will be educated on a variety of advanced intensive care topics. The primary focus is on evidence-based practice diagnostics and treatment of the critically ill patient. This course builds on previous coursework, including the Acute Care Nurse Practitioner core courses. Prerequisite: 306A, 307C, 340A, and Fundamental Critical Care Support Provider Certification through the Society of Critical Care Medicine's Course. [3] Spring BACK


396E. Advanced Critical Care Simulation. This course is designed to provide advanced cognitive and procedural experience in the critical care simulator at the Center for Experimental Learning and Assessment at the Vanderbilt School of Medicine. Simulations are designed to provide clinical content surrounding the management of complex patients in the ICU setting. These class sessions provide an opportunity for students to integrate complex diagnostics and therapeutics with communication and team management skills. Sessions focus on clinical situations that student NPs are unlikely to directly manage during their clinical rotation where more experienced providers are available. Prerequisite: 305B, 305F, 306A, 307C, 340A, 342C, 396D. Pre/corequisite: 340C, 343C. [1] Summer BACK


396F. Special Topics: Concepts of Emergency Nursing. This course provides students with the knowledge base and skills necessary to render emergency and trauma care. This will provide a foundation for future ACNP role development. The essential evaluation, stabilization and critical time management techniques will be discussed. It is essential that the ACNP functioning in the ER be experienced in the assessment of non-urgent, urgent and emergent conditions. In this course, the ACNP student will learn the techniques, physiology, and clinical skills necessary to care for adult patients in an emergency setting. Prerequisite: 305A or 305F. [Variable 2-3] Spring BACK


396G. Special Topics: Concepts in Trauma Nursing. This course explores, at an advanced practice level, pathophysiology, assessment and diagnosis and collaborative management of adults who have experienced a severe trauma. Each student will demonstrate in writing his or her ability to analyze, integrate, and synthesize pathophysiologic concepts and current research findings for the collaborative management of trauma patients. Pre/corequisite: 305A/B, 340A/B, 342. [2] Spring BACK


397A. Practicum in Emergency Care I. N397A is designed to provide clinical experience in development and application of the roles of the acute care emergency nurse practitioner. Emergency Department settings will allow the student to apply management skills and evaluate nursing theory, pathophysiologic and psychosocial concepts in planning care for adult patients. The student will practice in clinical settings for a total of 70 hours. Clinical conferences will be held weekly and will focus on pathophysiology, diagnoses, and therapeutic management related to emergency care of adults. Prerequisites: 305B, 306A, 307C, 340A. Corequisites: 340B, 342B, 396F. [1] Spring and Summer BACK


397B. Practicum in Emergency Care II. This course is designed to provide a capstone clinical experience in development and application of the roles of the dual Acute Care and Family NP for ED practice. Emergency Department settings will allow the student to apply management skills and evaluate nursing theory, pathophysiologic and psychosocial concepts in planning. The student will practice in clinical settings for a total of 70 hours. Clinical conferences will be held weekly and will focus on pathophysiology, diagnoses, and therapeutic management related to emergency care across the lifespan. Prerequisites: 305B, 306A, 307C, 309C, 340A, 340B, 342B, 396F, 397A. Corequisites: 309B, 309D, 362. [1] Spring BACK


399A. Scientific Underpinnings for Advanced Nursing Practice. This course explores the scientific and philosophical underpinnings of advanced nursing practice. Methods by which nursing knowledge is generated and levels of evidence informing nursing practice will be investigated. Use of advanced search strategies to support evidence-based practice is emphasized. This course builds on the student's basic understanding of the relationships among theory, evidence, and practice. [3] Spring BACK


399B. Conceptualization and Integration of Evidence for Advanced Nursing Practice. This course provides the student with the opportunity to explore a relevant problem in advanced nursing practice. Concepts related to the selected problem are identified and critically appraised. Methodologies to generate evidence will be presented to examine knowledge related to the selected problem and make practice recommendations. This course builds upon prerequisite knowledge. Prerequisite: N399A. [3] Summer BACK


NRSC302. Advanced Doctoral Seminar I. This course consists of a series of seminars focusing on issues related to qualifying examinations, the dissertation, and continued development of a program of research. The topics are selected by course faculty and the students who plan to take the comprehensive examinations withing the next 9-12 months. Topics and experiences may include proposal development, grant applications, mock proposal reviews, qualifying examination situations, and dissemination of research findings. The seminar is required for two consecutive semesters. Prerequisite: Core Ph.D. course completion consistent with ability to complete the qualifying examination within 9-12 months after registration. [1] Spring. Spring BACK


NRSC303. Advanced Doctoral Seminar II. This is the second seminar course in this series. Prerequisite: completion of NRSC 302: Advanced Doctoral Seminar I. [1] Summer. Summer BACK


NRSC304. Ethical And Legal Issues In Research. This course provides an overview of issues related to the responsible conduct of research, including data management, vulnerable populations, authorship and publication, conflicts of interest and collaboration. Federal and institutional guidelines are included. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. [1] BACK


NRSC305. Informatics And Scholarly Inquiry. This course provides an overview of informatics, the transformation of data into information, knowledge, decisions, and actions to improve outcomes. To take advantage of electronic data mines, scholars of the future will need to understand the basics of databases and the structure of nursing vocabularies. Knowledge management to support evidence-based practice in nursing will be a critical skill. In addition, this course prepares the student to use available technology tools to present, interpret, and organize data. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. [2] BACK


NRSC306. Research Design And Statistics I. This course focuses on understanding and applying the basic concepts of descriptive and relational research design and statistics. Students will be introduced to the full range of designs available to address research aims, moving from descriptive to experimental and quasi-experimental. After examining the relationship of research aims to research design, the nature of measurement, and causal inference, relevant statistical methods for visualizing, describing, and making inferences from data will be introduced. The focus will be on univariate and bivariate descriptive methods. Statistical computing packages will be used. Published research will be used to develop the student's ability to evaluate the design and statistical methods used to describe health care phenomena as well as relationships among them. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. [3] BACK


NRSC307. Research Design And Statistics II. The course expands the concepts and applications of RD&S I including an introduction to longitudinal and randomized control design issues. Topics related to internal validity, experimental designs, and issues in comparing individuals and groups cross-sectionally and longitudinally will be detailed. Students will be introduced to issues in external validity and the relationships between internal and external validities. Parametric and non-parametric univariate comparative statistical methods used to analyze data resulting from cross-sectional and randomized controlled designs will be included. Students will be expected to generate and interpret results from statistical software and present relevant information in figures, tables, and text. Concepts will be studied within the context of evaluating published research. Prerequisite: completion of Research Design and Statistics I or consent of faculty. [3] BACK


NRSC308. Research Design And Statistics III. This course is focused on advanced designs and multivariate statistical techniques. Design topics include advanced issues in external validity, field experimentation versus laboratory experiments, quasi-experimental and blended designs as well as special considerations for nested and complex longitudinal designs. Related statistical topics include advanced multiple linear regression methods (e.g. path and structural equation modeling), log-linear models and advanced techniques in survival and longitudinal data analysis. These methods and concepts will be discussed and evaluated through educational resources and published research using them. Students will have the opportunity to develop advanced skills in statistical applications most commonly used in their respective areas of interest. Prerequisite: completion of Research Design and Statistics II or consent of faculty. [3] BACK


NRSC309. Special Topics In Quantitative Methods. This course focuses on the skills needed to implement common quantitative data collection methods. The major focus of this course will be on survey methods--how to construct, administer, analyze, and interpret surveys and questionnaires, whether administered in written or verbal form (e.g., interviews), in person or via the mail or online. A portion of the course will cover the development of scales and indexes to incorporate in surveys. Sampling and observational methods to assess behavior and personal characteristics will be included. Prerequisite: completion of Research Design and Statistics I or consent of faculty. [2] Fall Fall BACK


NRSC310. Health, Health Care, Research, And Public Policy. This course explores and critically analyzes theoretical and empirical approaches to understanding dynamic synergies between research, nursing practice, health care organization, and public policy and their impact on health. Strategies for dissemination, translation, and evaluation of evidence-based research findings to support health care practices and public policies to measurably improve health outcomes for selected populations and the student's phenomenon of interest will be discussed. Local, national, and global implications will be explored. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. [2] BACK


NRSC311. Role of Scientist In Academe, Community, And World. This seminar course assists the student to develop a personal framework for behavior within academe, the scientific community, and the world beyond. Through readings and discussions, the student will explore a variety of viewpoints about the duties and responsibilities of an educated citizen scientist in an interdependent world. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. [1] BACK


NRSC312. Programs of Research And Grantsmanship. This course provides the foundational information necessary for developing a program of research. Focus is placed on acquiring practical skills necessary to develop a program of research, narrowing the focus of student's area of research, and for basic grantsmanship. Focus is placed upon developing the knowledge and practical skills necessary to investigate an area of research interest and draft a research proposal appropriate to current level of career development needs and/or phenomenon of interest. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. BACK


NRSC313. Theories of Science. This course provides students with an introduction to the central theoretical and philosophical issues concerning the nature of science, the patterns of knowing and knowledge development, criteria for evaluating knowledge claims, and philosophy of science. The course will enable students to become knowledgeable about the forces affecting the development of knowledge and critical analyses of theories commonly used in nursing research. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. [2] BACK


NRSC350. Conceptual Foundations For Clinical Research. Critical analysis of theories, concepts, and research related to the promotion, protection, and restoration of health across the lifespan at individual, family, and community levels. Emphasis will be on the individual level. Students conduct a critical analysis of existing and emerging scientific knowledge in a chosen field of study. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. [3] BACK


NRSC352. Measurement In Clinical Research. This course examines the principles of measurement, sources of measurement error, and procedures used for critical evaluation of the psychometric properties of clinical measures including techniques for assessing validity and reliability. Selected measures, commonly used in clinical research and specific to student research interests, will be evaluated for psychometric properties and fit with a proposed focus of study. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Ph.D. program and completion of NRSC 307 or NRSC 350; or consent of faculty. [3] Summer BACK


NRSC353. Designing And Testing Clinical Interventions. Analysis of methodological, ethical, and practical issues related to the design and implementation of theory-based intervention studies. Students conduct a critical analysis of existing and emerging interventions related to their chosen field of study. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. [3] BACK


NRSC366. Curriculum Strategies For Health Professional Education. This course introduces the student to the foundations of learning theory and learning styles. The impact of technology on learning practices and the appropriate use of technology to facilitate learning is emphasized. Students will create electronic elements for effective learning and use a course management system. Copyright and fair use issues are discussed. Overall curriculum strategies that integrate content, organization, informatics, and sequencing of courses are discussed. Students will design a learning program that integrates learning styles, technology use, and a course management system. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. [3] BACK


NRSC367. Educational Evaluation For Learning In The Health Professions. This course is designed to facilitate expertise in the application of fundamental educational concepts, principles, and theories to techniques of educational measurement and evaluation. The underlying premise for the value of such knowledge is that evaluation provides evidence for sound planning and development of classroom and clinical performance evaluation tools, as well as analyzing and interpreting test results within the context of current ethical, legal, and social educational guidelines. Prerequisite: Consent of faculty. [3] Summer. BACK


NRSC368. Contextual Nature Of Health And Health Behaviors. This course explores and critically analyzes theoretical and empirical approaches to understanding the interaction of health and environment in affecting health by examining contextual factors that impact health and health behaviors of various system levels. Examines disparity (e.g., social and economic) as a determinant of health among individuals and sub-populations. Critique selected models of health, health behavior, community organization, and health care delivery and their usefulness to understand and impact selected health phenomena and various ethno-cultural populations and communities. Students critically analyze and synthesize the literature related to a selected phenomenon of interest. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. BACK


NRSC377. Special Topics In Nursing Science. Students will discuss research and current developments of special interest to faculty and students (may be repeated for credit). Prerequisite: enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. [Variable credit: 1-3] BACK


NRSC379. Non-Candidate Research. Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. [Variable credit: 0-6] Fall, Spring, Summer BACK


NRSC380. Knowledge Synthesis In Nursing Science. This course provides a critical appraisal of the theoretical and empirical basis of nursing science. Theories and research generated to study phenomena related to nursing are evaluated and synthesized. Strategies for synthesizing extant knowledge in nursing are discussed. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. [3] BACK


NRSC381. Current Topics In Health Services Research. This course is designed to assist the student to develop expertise concerning the objectives, support mechanisms, limitations, and controversies of current HSR research initiatives and HSR organizations. Examples of initiatives include (but are not limited to) those of the IOM, governmental and private safety studies, QI/QA consortia, JCAHO, IHI, and other projects. The student will be expected to assess the relative place of her/his research interest in the current HSR environment and to begin to function within the professional role of a health services researcher. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. [3] BACK


NRSC382. Measuring Outcomes: Issues In Health Service Research Designs. In this course, the student will develop expertise in the design, measurement, and analysis of studies employing the five generic outcomes of greatest interest in outcomes studies: satisfaction, cost-effectiveness, mortality, health-related quality of life, and morbidity. The student will also be expected to develop an overview including measurement and analysis plans for a condition-specific outcome. The impact of the researcher's decisions regarding conceptual models, treatment definition, risk adjustment strategies, and the application of statistical techniques will be explored. At least one controversy attendant to each of the five generic outcomes will be debated in class. Prerequisite: completion of Research Design and Statistics I and II. [3] Summer BACK


NRSC383. Advanced Topics In Organizational Quality And Safety Research. The student will develop expertise in the design and execution of intervention studies in health services research. Emphasis will be placed on the selection of interventions and the valid and reliable execution of the interventions through examination of issues such as treatment fidelity, intervention duration, location and interventionist expertise. The intervention categories studied include: labor, capital and processes (e.g., working conditions and work design.) Strategies of attending to the execution and analysis of multilevel, multi-organizational studies will be addressed. [3] Fall. Fall BACK


NRSC390. Independent Study In Nursing Science. Individualized study and reading in areas of mutual interest to the student and faculty member. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. [Variable credit: 1-3] Fall, Spring, Summer BACK


NRSC394. Qualitative Research Methods. This course introduces and explores qualitative research methods, including their theoretical and methodological foundations, and practical applications. Course participants will explore and pilot test one method in the context of their topic of interest. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. [3] Summer BACK


NRSC395. Research Practicum. This course provides students with exposure to and involvement in the research process. Learning activities are based on student need and interest and determined according to best fit with available faculty research programs. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. [Variable credit: 1-3] BACK


NRSC399. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Ph.D. program and consent of faculty. [Variable credit: 0-6] Fall, Spring, Summer BACK



Doctor of Nursing Practice Courses

410. Evidence-Based Practice I: The Nature of Evidence. This course explores the philosophical underpinnings for nursing knowledge relevant to the role of the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP). Methods by which nursing knowledge is generated and levels of evidence informing nursing practice will be investigated. Students will identify and analyze concepts relevant to their topic of interest. Pre/corequisite: 414. [2] Fall BACK


412. Informatics for Scholarly Practice. This course provides an overview of informatics, the transformation of data into information, knowledge, decisions and actions to improve outcomes. To take advantage of electronic data mines, scholars of the future will need to understand the basics of databases and the structure of vocabularies. Knowledge management to support evidence-based practice will be a critical skill. In addition, this course prepares the student to use available technology tools to present, interpret and organize data. Admission to the DNP program or permission of instructors. [2] Fall BACK


414. Statistics in Health Sciences. This course provides an overview of the logic and appropriate use of statistical techniques most commonly reported in the research literature of the health professions. The spectrum of topics encompasses most univariate parametric and nonparametric procedures, including correlational and repeated measures analyses. Across the varied topics, emphasis is placed on: 1) becoming knowledgeable of the underlying logic of each statistical technique, 2) the appropriate use and underlying assumptions of the procedure, 3) interpretation of results from statistical software, and 4) evaluation of published results using statistical procedures. Admission to the DNP program or permission of instructors. [3] Fall and Spring BACK


420. Integrative Application of Evidence-Based Practice I. This is the first of a four-course series that provides the DNP student with mentored opportunities to develop an independent, analytic scholarly project proposal focusing on problems of practice within specific populations. To complete the objectives of this course successfully, the student is expected to practice a minimum of 125 hours in a practice area related to their topic of interest. Prerequisite: 410, 412, 414, 424; Pre/corequisite: 422. [1] Fall and Spring BACK


422. Evidence-Based Practice II: Evaluating and Applying Evidence. This course will build on Evidence-Based Practice I by preparing DNP students to evaluate evidence designed to improve clinical outcomes related to their identified topic of interest, and to translate the evidence into practice environments. Prerequisite: 410, 412, 414; Pre/corequisite: 422, 442. [3] Spring BACK


424. Epidemiology. Epidemiology focuses on the distribution and determinants of disease frequency in human populations. This course prepares the student to use epidemiological strategies to examine patterns of illness or injury in groups of people. Concepts of health, risk and disease causality are examined. Implications for development of data-based programs for disease/injury prevention and control as well as policy implications will be discussed. Prerequisite: 414. [3] Fall and Summer BACK


430. Integrative Application of Evidence-Based Practice II. In this second course of a three-course series, the DNP student works with a faculty mentor to refine the design and begin implementing the scholarly project. Students must successfully complete an oral presentation of the project prior to implementation. To complete the objectives of this course successfully, the student is expected to practice a minimum of 125 hours in a practice area related to their topic of interest. Each student will be required to submit individual objectives at the beginning of the semester. Prerequisite: 410, 412, 414, 420, 422, 442; Pre/corequisite 432, 444. [1] Spring and Summer BACK


432. Health Care Economics and Finance. This course covers basic economic theory, market drivers and restraints, health care finance and reimbursement, cost/benefit analysis and health care entrepreneurism. Theory and application are integrated throughout the course with a particular focus on the clinical role of the DNP within the contemporary health care environment. Students take either N432 or 434. Prerequisite: 410, 412, 414, 422; Pre/corequisite: 420. [3] Fall and Summer BACK


434. Advanced Health Care Economics and Finance. This course addresses advanced application of economic theory, financial principles and financial modeling in the health care market. Theory and application are integrated and aimed at preparing the student to assume an executive-level DNP role in large and complex health care organizations. Prerequisite: 410, 412, 414, 422; Pre/corequisite: 420. [3] Fall and Summer BACK


436. Program Development, Implementation and Evaluation. This course focuses on analysis and application of theory and expertise needed to assess, plan, implement and evaluate the clinical care of a population within integrated health systems. This course builds on behavioral, social and organizational sciences. Topics include: needs assessment stages and methodologies, development of mission statements and program designs, data management, allocation of resources, evaluation strategies and use of business plans. [3] Spring BACK


440. Integrative Application of Evidence-Based Practice III. In this final course of a three-course series, the DNP student evaluates the scholarly project specific to a population of interest within a practice setting. In order to successfully complete the objectives of this course, the student is expected to practice a minimum of 250 hours in a practice area related to their topic of interest. Prerequisite: 410, 412, 414, 420, 422, 424, 430, 432, 442, 444; Pre/corequisite: 452, 454. [2] Fall and Summer BACK


442. Quality Improvement and Patient Safety. This course prepares students to design, implement and evaluate evidence-based quality health care practices for patient populations (individuals and aggregates) in acute, home and community settings. Working as partners in interdisciplinary teams, students will assess organizational culture, gather safety information, analyze data and translate findings into systems changes through action learning experiences within their own organizations. Prerequisite: 410, 412, 414; Pre/corequisite: 422. [3] Spring and Summer BACK


444. Management of Organizations and Systems. This course synthesizes leadership theory and organizational models within the context of the health care industry. Models of human resource management, change management, strategic planning, program development and implementation will be explored and applied. Based on these theories and models, the student will derive the DNP's role in complex health care organizations. Prerequisite: 410, 412, 414, 420, 424, 442; Pre/corequisite: 430, 432. [3] Spring and Summer BACK


445. Evidence-Based Management in Healthcare Organizations and Systems. This course is designed for DNP students with demonstrated competencies in organizational theory and behavior, leadership principles and practices, and organizational structure and culture through prior graduate education and career history. These experienced nurse managers will apply evidence-based management methodology to their work environments. The DNP role is explored as an important catalyst for transforming traditional organizational decision-making and policy development to an evidence based approach. Prerequisite: 410, 412, 414, 420, 422, 424, 442; Pre/corequisite: 430, 432. [3] Spring and Summer BACK


452. Health Policy. This course addresses health policy from the perspectives of evidence development, analysis and economic impact within a socio-political context. There is a secondary focus on the role of regulation within the U.S. health care system. The DNP contribution to health policy development is explored. Prerequisite: 410, 412, 414, 420, 442; Pre/corequisite: 430, 440, 444. [2] Fall and Spring BACK


454. Legal and Ethical Environment. This course provides a comprehensive analysis of the legal, regulatory and ethical environments that impact DNP practice. Prerequisite: 410, 412, 414, 420, 422, 424, 430, 432, 442, 444; Pre/corequisite: 440, 452. [3] Fall and Summer BACK


460A. Obesity and Weight Control Part 1: Biology, Physiology and Epidemiology. Nationwide and worldwide the obesity epidemic is growing, and this has led to a significant number of adults and children with obesity-related comorbidities such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Awareness of this trend necessitates greater understanding of the link between adiposity and metabolic disease. This course will review the biological and physiological control of food intake and energy balance. The course will evaluate the metabolic pathways in which food and macronutrient intakes are utilized to provide energy and mechanisms by which body weight and health are influenced. Public health issues associated with obesity, energy and macronutrient intakes will be discussed as well as the adequacy of intakes in meeting recommended requirements at various life stages. Critical evaluation of peer-reviewed literature will be used to study prevention and risk factors of overweight and obesity, consequences with regard to metabolic syndrome and other chronic disease states, and public health issues. This course builds on undergraduate/graduate preparation in anatomy, physiology and biochemistry. Pre/corequisite: 410, 422. [2] Spring BACK


460B. Obesity and Weight Control Part 2: Management and Practice. Weight management and treatment of overweight, obesity, metabolic syndrome and other obesity related comorbidities requires multidisciplinary efforts. This course will build on the knowledge obtained in 460A to provide the student with a comprehensive understanding of national and organizational guidelines as well as current evidence based standards of care. The course will review the role of various health care providers in screening and assessment of body weight and energy balance. Patient management issues specific to age groups across the life cycle will be discussed as well as differences in practice and management by health care setting. The course content will include use of the scientific evidence to evaluate current dietary, pharmaceutical and surgical treatment models, strategies to optimize outcomes as well as identification and management of adverse outcomes. [2] Summer BACK


462. Management of Psychiatric Issues for the Non-Psychiatric-Mental Health Advanced Practice Nurse. Expand clinical competencies of Non-Psychiatric Mental Health Advanced Practice Nurses in assessing, evaluating, diagnosing, and treating mental health problems. This course will identify common mental health disorders seen in the primary and acute care settings including the epidemiology, etiology, risk factors and diagnostic signs/symptoms of these disorders. It will also provide clinical practice guidelines, screening tools and evidenced based treatment approaches to provide a foundation for the clinician to identify and manage common disorders within their scope of practice and setting. Students will also recognize when psychiatric consultation or specialty care is indicated. The course is designed for the non-mental health provider and builds on undergraduate/graduate preparation in anatomy, physiology, biochemistry within a cultural context. Prerequisite: Specialization in a non-Psychiatric-Mental Health Advanced Practice Nurse role. [2] Summer BACK


463. Scholarly Writing I. This elective is designed to provide graduate-level nurses with the knowledge and skills to be successful in articulating concepts and ideas in a logical and scholarly manner throughout their doctoral studies. This course begins by providing some general principles of expository writing, ensuring each student has a clear understanding of APA formatting. Development of strategies to use in achieving professional and effective communication through the written word will be stressed. Learning activities assist students to (a) write from an outline; (b) critique their own work; and (c) review and critique drafts from a colleague. [2] Spring BACK


464. Independent Study. Individualized study with content related to the student's practice and scholarly project. A contract is made between the student and faculty adviser with copies for the student, faculty adviser, program director, and student's academic record. With the adviser's guidance, the student is responsible for identifying study objectives and DNP competencies that are addressed within the course, and for specifying the primary DNP competency related to this study and learning activities and evaluation method. In addition, the student must complete the independent study agreement form that is available on the School of Nursing website. Prerequisite: Consent of faculty adviser. [Variable credit 1-4] Fall, Spring, Summer BACK


465A. Palliative Care I: Advanced Illness and Palliative Care. This is one of two palliative care electives designed to provide graduate level nurses with the knowledge and skills important to provide clinical care for clients of all ages living with advanced complex illness and their families. Paradigms are explored which link traditional models of both palliative and hospice care to the broader and deeper context of advanced illness in all developmental stages of life for patients of all ages. This course begins to develop the importance of a holistic perspective and an understanding of the client and families as individuals with diverse needs and expectations. Learning activities assist students to identify and recognize their own feelings, needs, and issues regarding chronic care, acute care, advanced care, and issues pertaining to death and dying so that they can effectively serve the multicultural needs of clients and families in a variety of advanced illness and palliative care contexts. The content for this course focuses mainly on symptom management from a holistic perspective. Other concepts of critical significance related to symptom assessment include care in a variety of settings, a variety of age groups, ethical decision making and therapeutic communication. [Formerly listed as NURS 325A] [2] Spring BACK


465B. Palliative Care II: Aspects Loss, Grief, Death, Bereavement, Spirituality, Cultural, Ethical Issues. This is one of two palliative care electives designed to provide graduate level nurses with the knowledge and skills important to provide clinical care for clients of all ages living with advanced complex illness and their families. In particular, this course presents selected theory and practice components of loss, grief, death and bereavement for patients, families, and professional caregivers. The course is designed to prepare practitioners through the development of the knowledge and skills for therapeutic and compassionate interactions with those facing advanced illness and death. The student will apply a wide range of ideas, beliefs, and understandings from multiple disciplines to end-of-life patient care scenarios. Learning activities assist the students to critically recognize their own feelings, learning needs, and biases regarding end of life care so that they can effectively serve the needs of clients and families in the palliative care trajectory. [Formerly offered as NURS 325B] [2] Summer BACK


466. Curriculum Strategies for Health Professional Education. (Required course for students who have received a Nurse Faculty Loan) This course introduces the student to the foundations of learning theory and learning styles. The impact of technology on learning practices and the appropriate use of technology to facilitate learning are emphasized. Students will create electronic elements for effective learning and use a course management system. Copyright and fair use issues are discussed. Overall curriculum strategies that integrate content, organization, informatics and sequencing of courses are discussed. Students will design a learning program that integrates learning styles, technology use and a course management system. Prerequisite: Admission to the DNP program or consent of faculty. [3] Fall and Spring BACK


467. Educational Evaluation for Learning in the Health Professions. (Required course for students who have received a Nurse Faculty Loan) This course explores issues related to evaluating educational offerings that employ technology. The advantages and disadvantages of both traditional and more novel approaches to evaluation are discussed. Students will learn how to create online surveys along with principles of test and survey management. Issues surrounding online testing, including access, privacy and data input accuracy are emphasized. Overall program benchmarks are explored. Prerequisite: Admission to the DNP program or consent of faculty. [3] Fall, Spring, Summer BACK


468. Advanced Concepts in Nursing Education. This course is designed to facilitate expertise in the application of advanced educational concepts, principles, and theories related to nursing education in the academic setting. The underlying premise for the value of such knowledge is that nurse educators encounter situations and issues that warrant systematic consideration, and reflection. Moreover, students will acquire competence in facilitating learner development and role socialization, review accreditation parameters for nursing programs, and explore various aspects and topics such as legal, ethical and socio-cultural factors related to the role of the nurse educator. Prerequisites: 466, 467. [3] Fall BACK


469. Lean Methodology in Healthcare. This course focuses on the analysis and application of Lean principles to improve a process or system. This course builds on the quality improvement principles learned in NURS 442 (Quality Improvement and Patient Safety). Topics include a history of the Toyota production system including how to identify the eight wastes in healthcare, how to implement 5S, A3 concepts, data collection, and value stream mapping of current state and future state processes. Prerequisite: 442. [2] Fall BACK